MOCpages : Share your LEGO® creations
LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Math & ScienceLEGO in real life
Welcome to the world's greatest LEGO fan community!
Explore cool creations, share your own, and have lots of fun together.  ~  It's all free!
Conversation »
General conversation
Join to comment
I seem to recall that nanofibers have military potential with regards to armour; is that correct?
Permalink
| February 5, 2009, 9:07 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Areetsa C
I seem to recall that nanofibers have military potential with regards to armour; is that correct?


You are correct:
http://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8#hl=en&q=nanotubes+fibers+body+armor&fp=WU1e2t4wsmE
Permalink
| February 6, 2009, 1:34 pm
Quoting Areetsa C
I seem to recall that nanofibers have military potential with regards to armour; is that correct?

sup
Permalink
| February 11, 2009, 3:37 pm
Alright, another question: assume you have a large tube. This tube is not metallic, rather it is a conductor; plastic, ceramic, etc. Now, it is wrapped in copper wire bundles. Electricity is sent through those bundles one after another, and a lump of iron is accellerated. The tube is filled with a gas; let's assume it's normal air.

If I am correct, the projectile would be given a coating of white-hot plasma if it reached the correct speed. Is that correct?

I think it might be, but plasma physics isn't exactly my field of expertise. In fact, most science is not my field of expertise, but I would rather not go spouting off about why something would or would not work without being relatively sure.
Permalink
| March 17, 2009, 3:30 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Areetsa C
Alright, another question: assume you have a large tube. This tube is not metallic, rather it is a conductor; plastic, ceramic, etc.

you mean a non-conductor.
Quoting
Now, it is wrapped in copper wire bundles. Electricity is sent through those bundles one after another, and a lump of iron is accellerated. The tube is filled with a gas; let's assume it's normal air.

If I am correct, the projectile would be given a coating of white-hot plasma if it reached the correct speed. Is that correct?

I think it might be, but plasma physics isn't exactly my field of expertise. In fact, most science is not my field of expertise, but I would rather not go spouting off about why something would or would not work without being relatively sure.

What you are describing is a railgun http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railgun that can accelerate it's projectile fast enough to create the same ram pressure http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ram_pressure heating that a meteor http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meteor gets hitting the the upper atmosphere at say 20-50 kps

Permalink
| March 31, 2009, 12:43 am
Yes, that's what I meant, a non-conductor.

Actually, I'm describing a coilgun, which is similar but more practical.

What I wanted to know was, would the projectile of such a weapon, fired at sea level, produce a coating of plasma around itself?
Permalink
| March 31, 2009, 1:13 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Areetsa C
Yes, that's what I meant, a non-conductor.

Actually, I'm describing a coilgun, which is similar but more practical.

You are correct you did describe a coilgun, my mistake. I think of them all as railguns.

Quoting Areetsa C
What I wanted to know was, would the projectile of such a weapon, fired at sea level, produce a coating of plasma around itself?

Yes, if it's fast enough, because of ram pressure heating. Just the same as the plasma around an incoming meteor. It's what makes the meteor bright!
Permalink
| March 31, 2009, 10:36 am
Yes, thanks.
Permalink
| March 31, 2009, 4:11 pm
Other topics
« General conversation



LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Math & ScienceLEGO in real life


You Your home page | LEGO creations | Favorite builders
Activity Activity | Comments | Creations
Explore Explore | Recent | Groups
MOCpages is an unofficial, fan-created website. LEGO® and the brick configuration are property of The LEGO Group, which does not sponsor, own, or endorse this site.
©2002-2014 Sean Kenney Design Inc | Privacy policy | Terms of use