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I always thought Latin in latin was feminine first declension...
Permalink
| April 26, 2011, 9:10 pm
Salvete, amici!
Permalink
| April 26, 2011, 9:11 pm
Quoting Jman McAwesome
Salvete, amici!

Salve, McAwesome!

complures homines invitemus! (Let's invite some more people, guys! What about Sebeus I or Deus?)
Permalink
| April 27, 2011, 5:28 am
Quoting Michael Kringe
Salve, McAwesome!

complures homines invitemus! (Let's invite some more people, guys! What about Sebeus I or Deus?)

sic, imagus hic me iuvat!
Permalink
| April 27, 2011, 7:44 pm
Quoting Jman McAwesome
sic, imagus hic me iuvat!

atque me! XD
Permalink
| April 28, 2011, 5:35 am
Quoting Michael Kringe
atque me! XD

LOL. XD
Permalink
| April 28, 2011, 7:22 am
Isn't 'Latin' a first declension noun? I know it is. Therefore a group called "Speakers of Latin" should be "Oratores Latinae". 'Oratores Latinorum' means 'Speakers of Latins' (masculine plural) which is not a legitimate Classical Latin phrase. Making 'Latin'-'Latinorum' violates two principals. (1) you cannot pluralize your genitive modifier just because the subject is plural. Just because the 'Speakers [Oratores]' are plural does not mean 'of Latin' must be. (2) Having 'Latinorum' suggests that Latin is a 2nd declension masculine noun. 'Latinus' would be the root word. This is incorrect. Most languages and peoples were given 1st declension (feminine) names (i.e. Britannica [Britain], Gallica [Gaul], Aegypta [Egypt], Latina[Latin], Romana [Rome],and Athenae [Athens]). So I don't know if it is possible, but you [Cuttlefish .] should change the group name to "Oratores Latinae". That would satisfy all Latin rules and make me happy. :)

P.S. Does anyone know what 'Christopher' Means in Latin? (Knowing the story of St. Christopher might help).
Permalink
| May 2, 2011, 6:45 pm
Quoting Christopher Baldacci
Isn't 'Latin' a first declension noun? I know it is. Therefore a group called "Speakers of Latin" should be "Oratores Latinae". 'Oratores Latinorum' means 'Speakers of Latins' (masculine plural) which is not a legitimate Classical Latin phrase. Making 'Latin'-'Latinorum' violates two principals. (1) you cannot pluralize your genitive modifier just because the subject is plural. Just because the 'Speakers [Oratores]' are plural does not mean 'of Latin' must be. (2) Having 'Latinorum' suggests that Latin is a 2nd declension masculine noun. 'Latinus' would be the root word. This is incorrect. Most languages and peoples were given 1st declension (feminine) names (i.e. Britannica [Britain], Gallica [Gaul], Aegypta [Egypt], Latina[Latin], Romana [Rome],and Athenae [Athens]). So I don't know if it is possible, but you [Cuttlefish .] should change the group name to "Oratores Latinae". That would satisfy all Latin rules and make me happy. :)

P.S. Does anyone know what 'Christopher' Means in Latin? (Knowing the story of St. Christopher might help).

yeah... I kinda already mentioned that... thanks for summing it up though:) Umm... sorry, I don't know the story of St. Christopher...

Permalink
| May 2, 2011, 6:53 pm
Quoting Doc. Jared McAwesome
yeah... I kinda already mentioned that... thanks for summing it up though:) Umm... sorry, I don't know the story of St. Christopher...

Well St. Christopher wanted to serve the greatest king ever. So he went and served the devil for a while, but found that Satan shuddered at crosses. So he figured the man of the cross must be greater than satan and wanted to serve that man. so he left to serve God. He was charged with carrying travellers over a swift river. he felt he had a lame job, but one day he was told to carry a little baby over the river. After a laborious journey, he brought the infant safe to the other side. The baby was Jesus. So he was given the name Christopher. Christopher comes from the Latin words "CHRISTus" and the verb "ferro, ferre, tuli, latum" meaning 'to bear. So using the Greek spelling of the 'f' sound in 'ph', the name Christopher means 'Bearer of Christ'. Neat, no?
Permalink
| May 2, 2011, 7:05 pm
Quoting Christopher Baldacci
Well St. Christopher wanted to serve the greatest king ever. So he went and served the devil for a while, but found that Satan shuddered at crosses. So he figured the man of the cross must be greater than satan and wanted to serve that man. so he left to serve God. He was charged with carrying travellers over a swift river. he felt he had a lame job, but one day he was told to carry a little baby over the river. After a laborious journey, he brought the infant safe to the other side. The baby was Jesus. So he was given the name Christopher. Christopher comes from the Latin words "CHRISTus" and the verb "ferro, ferre, tuli, latum" meaning 'to bear. So using the Greek spelling of the 'f' sound in 'ph', the name Christopher means 'Bearer of Christ'. Neat, no?

Wow, that is cool. Funnily enough, we just learned ferro today for our vocab test!
Permalink
| May 3, 2011, 3:53 pm
Well, did you learn why ferro has such a weird past perfect and supine?
Permalink
| May 9, 2011, 6:08 pm
Quoting Christopher Baldacci
Well, did you learn why ferro has such a weird past perfect and supine?

Sadly no. We're learning that tomorrow. Today we just wanted to learn how to conjugate it. Apparently it's semi-deponent! :)
Permalink
| May 9, 2011, 7:26 pm
Quoting Doc. Jared McAwesome
Sadly no. We're learning that tomorrow. Today we just wanted to learn how to conjugate it. Apparently it's semi-deponent! :)

I don't know what 'semi-deponent' means, but I know that 'semi-deponere' means 'half-to place about'. So I'm kindof scratching my head on that one. But basically 'Ferro, ferre" stole its past-perfect and supine from another verb (escaping me right now) because of how ferro was constructed. If you learn it, maybe you could refresh my memory on the specifics.
Permalink
| May 10, 2011, 9:25 am
Quoting Christopher Baldacci
I don't know what 'semi-deponent'



If you learn it, maybe you could refresh my memory on the specifics.

Oh: Semi-deponent just means that it conjugates in perfect, pluperfect, and future perfect as a deponent, but active in meaning.
Sure, I'll refresh you at about 4 when my Latin lesson is over!
Permalink
| May 10, 2011, 9:37 am
Quoting Christopher Baldacci
Isn't 'Latin' a first declension noun? I know it is. Therefore a group called "Speakers of Latin" should be "Oratores Latinae". 'Oratores Latinorum' means 'Speakers of Latins' (masculine plural) which is not a legitimate Classical Latin phrase. Making 'Latin'-'Latinorum' violates two principals. (1) you cannot pluralize your genitive modifier just because the subject is plural. Just because the 'Speakers [Oratores]' are plural does not mean 'of Latin' must be. (2) Having 'Latinorum' suggests that Latin is a 2nd declension masculine noun. 'Latinus' would be the root word. This is incorrect. Most languages and peoples were given 1st declension (feminine) names (i.e. Britannica [Britain], Gallica [Gaul], Aegypta [Egypt], Latina[Latin], Romana [Rome],and Athenae [Athens]). So I don't know if it is possible, but you [Cuttlefish .] should change the group name to "Oratores Latinae". That would satisfy all Latin rules and make me happy. :)

P.S. Does anyone know what 'Christopher' Means in Latin? (Knowing the story of St. Christopher might help).

Oratores Latinorum is definitely not wrong. I had something similar in my classtest and it means "Latin Speakers" (the speakers are Latin guys). But you are definitely right: In this case we must choose "Oratores Latinae", because we want to underline the language and not the people.
Permalink
| May 18, 2011, 8:17 am



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