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Building a SHIP
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So there was this guy I saw earlier who I marked as a favorite builder because I simply cannot resist clicking on something Iím told not to click;) Gave me a good chuckle, Guy.

That Guy You Saw Earlier started a thread dealing with the size of a MOC and warning about building too large. That is sound advice, but I have discovered that the smaller I build, the further out of my own comfort zone I venture. Building large gives you more room to work and throw in all those greebly little details that are running through your mind. I donít have a lot of techniques to offer that are too hard to figure out, but I think I can at least shed some light on building large spaceships. Here is some advice I wish I had been given when I started my first SHIP.

The biggest enemy to a large spaceship is weight. The more you hang on a LEGO brick, the more risk you run of the whole thing reducing itself to a pile of individual pieces. (Trust me, this is the voice of experience). The key to building a SHIP is a strong core. If youíre building a SHIP and youíre starting with anything that will be seen in the finished product, you are probably starting in the wrong place. Begin with the core.

There are many ways to achieve this core. You can go with the more complicated, like what you will find in the works of the brilliant Garry King:

http://www.mocpages.com/home.php/39677.

If you are unfamiliar with his work, definitely click that link and check out his page. He is also very good about showing you some of the guts of his works. If a SHIP is what you want to build, this is a good place to start.

When I have built my SHIPs, I have gone with a simpler core structure. It is what I like to call the brick sandwich. Itís very basic. You start with a layer of plates. I recommend going with at least 6-studs wide, (not necessarily 6 studs per plate, but the sum of the parts). Iíve found that any less doesnít have enough surface for the studs to hold. Lay them out with the length of your SHIP in mind. Itís important to remember, though, that your finished MOC should be a little longer on both ends to cover your core. Add a layer of bricks of varying size across your length of plates, paying special care to overlap the seams as much as you can. When youíve finished that, your structure will not be strong enough to hold any weight, so add another layer of plates across the tops of your bricks, again overlapping the seams. If you want additional strength, it would not be a bad idea to add another layer of plates across the top and bottom of the sandwich. It doesnít have to be as wide, just as long as it overlaps the seams. When you have all that together, you have a very strong plank of LEGO and the beginning of your SHIP.

I like to build two of these sandwiches with Technic bricks on the outside and connect them with Technic liftarms so you have studs facing up and down. From there, I usually get the shape Iím looking for with plates and click joints. Specifically, this piece:

http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=44301

and this piece:

http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=44302

Once you hang a plate, I also recommend bracing the connections between the plate and the click joint with even more plates. Sure, it gets weighty, but, trust me, itís strong.

If you want an idea of what Iím talking about, you can get a decent look at it here:

http://www.mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=371491&id=/user_images/85910/1380828393m

(as well as the mess that I make of my living room every night).

Hope this is helpful. Happy building.
Permalink
| April 2, 2014, 9:30 pm
Quoting Tim C
So there was this guy I saw earlier who I marked as a favorite builder because I simply cannot resist clicking on something Iím told not to click;) Gave me a good chuckle, Guy.

That Guy You Saw Earlier started a thread dealing with the size of a MOC and warning about building too large. That is sound advice, but I have discovered that the smaller I build, the further out of my own comfort zone I venture. Building large gives you more room to work and throw in all those greebly little details that are running through your mind. I donít have a lot of techniques to offer that are too hard to figure out, but I think I can at least shed some light on building large spaceships. Here is some advice I wish I had been given when I started my first SHIP.

The biggest enemy to a large spaceship is weight. The more you hang on a LEGO brick, the more risk you run of the whole thing reducing itself to a pile of individual pieces. (Trust me, this is the voice of experience). The key to building a SHIP is a strong core. If youíre building a SHIP and youíre starting with anything that will be seen in the finished product, you are probably starting in the wrong place. Begin with the core.

There are many ways to achieve this core. You can go with the more complicated, like what you will find in the works of the brilliant Garry King:

http://www.mocpages.com/home.php/39677.

If you are unfamiliar with his work, definitely click that link and check out his page. He is also very good about showing you some of the guts of his works. If a SHIP is what you want to build, this is a good place to start.

When I have built my SHIPs, I have gone with a simpler core structure. It is what I like to call the brick sandwich.
haha lol! You're not the only one! Good advice Ill try it next time I build a ship. Was wondering, will this technique work if you want to build an interior or is it just for big good looking builds without the insides?
Permalink
| April 3, 2014, 4:11 am
Quoting That guy you saw earlier
haha lol! You're not the only one! Good advice Ill try it next time I build a ship. Was wondering, will this technique work if you want to build an interior or is it just for big good looking builds without the insides?

The brick sandwich would definitely work. I started doing it on this build here:

http://www.mocpages.com/moc.php/369220

If you do the Technic variation, I would recommend using the same liftarm, only turning it the opposite way to cut down on the space between the floor of your interior and the underside of the ship. In the SHIP I was building, I didn't use the liftarms, (to leave room for the landing gear I was constructing), but wrapped the plates around with more click joints.

I have also toyed with the idea of a modular interior. Building each room individually with no more than the thickness of two plates on the floor, then arranging the rooms along the brick sandwich.

When I get through the list of MOCs I want to build, I plan on revisiting this concept, so hopefully within this decade;)

Thanks for the interest, That Guy.
Permalink
| April 3, 2014, 7:26 am
Quoting Tim C
That's a great MOC! I see what you mean though - I must try it out sometime.

Permalink
| April 3, 2014, 7:35 am
Quoting Tim C
Hi Tim,

Was wondering if you could make some GIMP tutorials for engine "fire" and laser shots.

Thanks

Permalink
| April 5, 2014, 4:05 am
 Group moderator 
Most interesting. As of now, my collection is not big enough to support large ships, but I will try it someday.

Permalink
| April 11, 2014, 10:57 am
Quoting Mr. Cab
Most interesting. As of now, my collection is not big enough to support large ships, but I will try it someday.

Its quite fun at times (especially when it all comes together) but most of the time you just swear a lot errr I mean .. it can be very frustrating :) I'm just finishing my first one off now!
Permalink
| April 14, 2014, 3:37 pm
Why is a SHIP written in caps? Is it an acronym, or only an affectation on the part of SHIPwrights? If it's the latter, then be warned - there will be CASTLEs in the future.
Permalink
| April 14, 2014, 3:54 pm
Quoting Gilbert Despathens
Why is a SHIP written in caps? Is it an acronym, or only an affectation on the part of SHIPwrights? If it's the latter, then be warned - there will be CASTLEs in the future.

SHIP stands for Serisoly Huge Investment in Parts.
Permalink
| April 14, 2014, 4:25 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Adam Brunsting
SHIP stands for Serisoly Huge Investment in Parts.

"Significantly", I thought. But yeah. :P
Permalink
| April 14, 2014, 4:27 pm
Quoting Kai Bernstein
Significantly, I thought. But yeah. :P

Both are used commonly.
Permalink
| April 14, 2014, 4:28 pm
Quoting Adam Brunsting
SHIP stands for Serisoly Huge Investment in Parts.

Does that mean that a SHIP is not necessarily a ship?
Permalink
| April 14, 2014, 5:21 pm
 Group admin 
Wait a sec, a ship as in a ship on the sea or...
Permalink
| April 14, 2014, 5:29 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Adam Brunsting
SHIP stands for Serisoly Huge Investment in Parts.

...Or ship as in what this dude said?
Permalink
| April 14, 2014, 5:29 pm
Quoting Gilbert Despathens
Does that mean that a SHIP is not necessarily a ship?

It usually refers to a spaceship, of Kelso scale.

Permalink
| April 14, 2014, 5:35 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Adam Brunsting
It usually refers to a spaceship, of Kelso scale.

A Kelso scale ship would be HUGE!
Permalink
| April 14, 2014, 5:37 pm
Quoting Thomas B.
A Kelso scale ship would be HUGE!

Mines not quite that big - its 112 studs long - I'm posting it today!
Permalink
| April 15, 2014, 11:39 am
For a spaceship to be considered a SHIP, it is generally expected to be at least 100 studs in length.

As a funny little side note, some call it a Seriously Huge Investment in Time;) And yes, I must agree with That Guy...you spend a lot of that time cursing at it.
Permalink
| April 15, 2014, 7:27 pm
So if one were to build a 162 studs by 40 studs (at its thinnest) (82 at its widest) 6 2/3 bricks tall base for a trebuchet, that would count as a SHIP?
Permalink
| April 15, 2014, 7:46 pm
Quoting Sam Sanister
So if one were to build a 162 studs by 40 studs (at its thinnest) (82 at its widest) 6 2/3 bricks tall base for a trebuchet, that would count as a SHIP?

yes I think but it depends on how many pieces you put into it I guess
Permalink
| April 16, 2014, 7:31 am
Quoting That guy you saw earlier
yes I think but it depends on how many pieces you put into it I guess

It's 6 and 2/3 bricks thick, 162 studs long and 40 wide. It's not a small amount of pieces. 3 and 2/3 of the height is plates. with 2 Technic layers and 1 regular brick layer.
Permalink
| April 16, 2014, 5:09 pm
Quoting Sam Sanister
It's 6 and 2/3 bricks thick, 162 studs long and 40 wide. It's not a small amount of pieces. 3 and 2/3 of the height is plates. with 2 Technic layers and 1 regular brick layer.

errr... I dunno :) SHIP is usually applied to ships ;)
Permalink
| April 16, 2014, 5:26 pm
 Group moderator 
Quoting Thomas B.
Wait a sec, a ship as in a ship on the sea or...

Normally it is a spaceship, but occasionally they will be flying ships (as in ships that would normally go in the water but that can fly) and that sort of stuff. It is only rarely used to refer to a normal in-the-water ship, and never to describe, say, a 123 studs long piano. :P
Permalink
| April 16, 2014, 5:54 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Gilbert Despathens
Why is a SHIP written in caps? Is it an acronym, or only an affectation on the part of SHIPwrights? If it's the latter, then be warned - there will be CASTLEs in the future.

Crazily Awesome Structure That Landscaping Encircles
Permalink
| April 16, 2014, 6:09 pm
Quoting That guy you saw earlier
errr... I dunno :) SHIP is usually applied to ships ;)

Would you call "Flinger 2.0" on MOCpages a SHIP?
Permalink
| April 16, 2014, 9:11 pm
Quoting Sam Sanister
Would you call "Flinger 2.0" on MOCpages a SHIP?

I'll check it out :)
Permalink
| April 17, 2014, 4:21 am
Quoting That guy you saw earlier
I'll check it out :)

Our trebuchet is taller, longer, and wider than Flinger 2.0, and we don't have base plates as our base(They add 6 studs to the width of his treb). It's also built on wheels, unlike jeffery veins's.
Permalink
| April 20, 2014, 7:56 pm
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