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6 or 8 wide???
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Hi,i would know,whatīs your favourite scale? 6 or 8 wide. I think many trains looks better in 8 wide,because itīs difficult to build some engines(for example: GTELīs) in 6 wide.
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| January 17, 2009, 2:00 pm
Personally, I have more experience with 6-wide, But I'd be willing to try 8-wide sometime.
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| January 17, 2009, 2:02 pm
I always make 2 studs wider than the usual. For example, I made my monorail 6-wide. 8-wide is more to scale with minifigs.
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| January 23, 2009, 6:54 pm
Just in between. I'm building 7-wide. I find it a bit more realistic. It's a building challenge but the results are perfect. Just take a look at Ben Beneke's great engines or Puntcom's creations at Brickshelf. I'm really pleased with my BR66, but I'm still learning.
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| February 20, 2009, 6:03 pm
A little experience with 3-wide...I'm building 7-wide, 8-wide and 9-wide for Steam Train. I also found this scale more realistic.

My little theory on the scale is as follows: 1 stud = 1 foot, so a diesel 2m70 wide, it is 8-wide, a steam locomotive with cylinders, 3m wide, it is 9-wide, like my 141R840.
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| March 13, 2009, 5:59 pm
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I've built 6, 7, and 8 wide trains, and personally I find 8 wide to be the most visually pleasing. However, 6 wide is probably the easiest in which to build simply because of the small amount of parts required.

I'm about to begin construction on a massive 10-wide steamer, so I'll have to wait and see how that turns out.
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| April 13, 2009, 1:53 pm
I've been a 6-wide builder for many years, although I recently ventured into 8-wide. 8-wide models seem huge compared to the scale of other LEGO sets, so they don't quite fit in, but they do make for an impressive build. Well-done 8-wide stock has somewhat of a "wow" factor due to the sheer large scale of the models.

The parts count for 8-wide is almost double that of 6-wide - an important consideration when cost is an issue.


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| April 14, 2009, 3:17 pm
8-Wide. You can add more details and on 6-wide sometimes the trucks can be wider than the frame of the locomotive or piece of rolling stock itself. Plus 8-wide trains look more impressive and more to scale.
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| May 7, 2009, 3:33 pm
For my first MOC I went straight to 8 wide as I found it looks more to scale with the minifig and like Lucas mentioned, the proportions can be more realistic. Like Richard I am also going with the 1 foot = 1 stud theory. Jordan is right about the models not fitting in with regular Lego sets though so building an entire town to suite could get expensive.... but oh so much fun!
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| August 1, 2009, 10:14 am
Quoting Alex McKenna
*snip* Like Richard I am also going with the 1 foot = 1 stud theory *snip*

That seems to work on most occasions on frame length. For example: a real life SD90 is around 80 feet. 80 studs-give or take a few seems around right

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| August 16, 2009, 7:58 pm
I usually make 6-wide trains. What's the difference between 6-wide and 8-wide?
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| January 6, 2010, 5:57 pm
6-wide trains are the classic width that LEGO has been using on their train sets. Many fans prefer them since they are smaller (and thus cost less). However, many fans like 8-wide trains since they are more to scale with mini-figs, the track, and since they are wider, they give more room for details.

As for me, I just go with whatever the train would seem to let itself fit into. If I can see the train being made as a 6-wider I go with that. However if it is larger or I want to add more detail then I make it an 8-wider.
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| January 6, 2010, 6:56 pm
Yoshi, I guess you're right. My PRR GP9 is about 6-wide.
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| January 7, 2010, 6:25 pm
I like 8-wide because I can fit minifigs in both sides of a coach that way, with a small walkway between. But you have to use old torsos for that, or remove the arms.

For my trains themselves, and small wagons, I'm more lenient. I'm building a red 6-wide diesel. Been working off and on on it for like a year. It's not a masterpiece, but it's starting to get there :P
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| February 7, 2010, 1:49 pm
It depends on the train, I suppose. Something like a Big Boy 4-8-8-4 should probably have a seven-wide boiler and then greebles up to a stud more on either side to show how huge it is in real life. A Sterling 8-ft, on the other hand, should be built with a four-wide boiler and a six-wide (seven wide including greebles and the outer wheel covers) base.
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| January 4, 2011, 4:30 pm
I'm in the middle, because the trains in QLD (Australia) run on narrow gage, I model 8 wide and 2 flat sections over the top of the emerald night passenger car. So I'm on my own scale that looks really cool and matches my 9V emerald night that is 8 wide and 10 times better than the PF one.
But there are two scales in 6 wide. US trains are one brick larger (i.e. BNSF and SantaFe ) than the train's model on UK trains ( i.e the new PF trains and RC ones and older Lego sets like the metro liner ).
Out of all the experience I've had, about 200, 6 wide trains on ldd and 50-70, 8 wide on ldd over 2 years I personally like 8 wide trains because you can have lot's more detail and better looking trains.
Basically if you like to have more electrics and diesel train's than steam loco's go with 6 wide if you want steam trainĄĶs than go with 8 wide, Although steam trains in Lego are much harder than other types of trains because of the wheel arrangements and the boiler positions.
Either way it's a lot of fun!! :)
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| January 4, 2011, 4:39 pm
I would never do a 6-wide. I think they are too ugly, and posibilities are limited.
8-wide would be the correct scale, according to minifig and track-gauge, but 7-wide might be a perfect compromise for WORKING Lego-trains; Big enough for details, and small enough to be practical. (Those Lego-curves are VERY sharp turns...) When I say 7-wide I mean the base itself. I dont count stairs or grip-irons into that equation. They can stick out further... -Just dont forget to check for clearance! lol
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| January 20, 2011, 6:48 am
I have actually been building in 10 wide; I think 8 or 9 looks the best though. I used to build 6 wide but then I started building my cars bigger. I really think it depends on how big the rest of your stuff is. I would love to build in only 8 wide, it would be *SO* much easier, but my cars are 8 wide and trucks are 10! In real life a train is even wider than a truck is, so 10 is about right. What I really need is some 7 wide rails to mach how wide my train is. If you think about it you can't really convert studs to feet because minifigs are way out of proportions. On a real train you can fit at least 4 seats in a row and still have an isle in between. Even building 10 wide I can only fit 3 seats and an isle, and you have to take the Minifigs arms off in order to get more then 2 per row anyway. It also depends on the amount of parts your willing to use, on a budget: 6 wide, want lots of detail: 8 wide, love making things impossibly difficult: 10 wide. Of coarse you can always go any where in-between like 7 or 9 too.
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| April 11, 2011, 10:17 pm
Well that massive 10 wide steamer I have been troubleshooting for the last 2 (or is it 3) years finally runs flawlessly! But from now on I am building 8 wides and calling in narrow gauge. Of course I'm never taking that 10 wide apart, too much work has gone into it to ever do that, lets just say it is a standard gauge train modified for narrow gauge track, OK? AND LET THIS BE A WARNING FOR EVERY ONE ELSE OUT THERE, DO NOT BUILD 10 WIDE TRAINS!!! YOUR SANITY WILL THANK YOU!
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| September 13, 2011, 12:06 am
I build in 7 Wide too and i prefer this scale for the details,i,m in the opinion oh Hoexbroe, 8 wide itīs the best scale but the Lego rails donīt make them for this scale, trains could be a lot of problems in city circuits for example.
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| September 13, 2011, 2:02 am
Quoting aitor fernandez
I build in 7 Wide too and i prefer this scale for the details,i,m in the opinion oh Hoexbroe, 8 wide itīs the best scale but the Lego rails donīt make them for this scale, trains could be a lot of problems in city circuits for example.

Quoting aitor fernandez
I build in 7 Wide too and i prefer this scale for the details,i,m in the opinion oh Hoexbroe, 8 wide itīs the best scale but the Lego rails donīt make them for this scale, trains could be a lot of problems in city circuits for example.

In terms of how it is scaled to the track I think 8 wide actually fits the best, it makes the train overhang the track just the right amount. The problem is that LEGO turns are just too darn tight even scaled for 6 wide trains. 7 is probably about right for small switch engines, but for full sized locomotives and cars, I think 8 looks better. Of course even in 10 wide you run into the problem of Minifigs being 2 feet wide and only 5 feet tall.
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| September 13, 2011, 2:53 pm
Hello, I am currently working on a 8 wide model of the 1959 Lionel General train set. I will be posting pictures of the process every once in a while. I am currently waiting for a eBay and PAB order. God, Lego ships slowly.....
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| March 21, 2012, 7:35 pm
Quoting Patrick L.
Hi,i would know,whatīs your favourite scale? 6 or 8 wide. I think many trains looks better in 8 wide,because itīs difficult to build some engines(for example: GTELīs) in 6 wide.

I think if Lego is the priority, it has to be 6 wide as that is Lego scale. If trains are the priority, then 8 wide, as it gives you much more scope to make accurate models. I went six and put up with the limitations.

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| April 30, 2012, 7:13 am
Quoting Tris B
I think if Lego is the priority, it has to be 6 wide as that is Lego scale. If trains are the priority, then 8 wide, as it gives you much more scope to make accurate models. I went six and put up with the limitations.

What do you mean by lego priority? To minifigs, 8 wide is more to scale.
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| April 30, 2012, 2:32 pm
Quoting T. Young
What do you mean by lego priority? To minifigs, 8 wide is more to scale.

I think I mean Lego for Lego's sake as opposed to Lego as a tool with which to model. Lego itself has evolved from leaning more towards the former to more towards the latter. Yes, eight wide is more to scale but when you talk of scale it hints of model more than toy. Both scales are good and both have merit.

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| April 30, 2012, 2:44 pm
Quoting Tris B
Quoting T. Young
What do you mean by lego priority? To minifigs, 8 wide is more to scale.

I think I mean Lego for Lego's sake as opposed to Lego as a tool with which to model. Lego itself has evolved from leaning more towards the former to more towards the latter. Yes, eight wide is more to scale but when you talk of scale it hints of model more than toy. Both scales are good and both have merit.

Well lego to us IS a modeling tool. But all scales have their advantages.
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| April 30, 2012, 2:57 pm
I just switched over from 10 wide to 8 wide. The gauge of the LEGO track is most to scale with 10 wide, but it is just too hard to deal with the curves. I've got a small 8 wide 2-6-2 Locomotive now and it runs like a dream (compared to my 10 wide 6-8-4 that derailed and broke apart all the time).
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| January 27, 2014, 10:52 pm
Quoting Patrick L.
Hi,i would know,whatīs your favourite scale? 6 or 8 wide. I think many trains looks better in 8 wide,because itīs difficult to build some engines(for example: GTELīs) in 6 wide.

3 wide indeed!
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| June 30, 2014, 10:16 am
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