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Curved walls
The technique that I get the most questions about that I use is the curved wall technique that I used on my Fortress of Solitude and for the wave in my Atlantis MOC. Here's how the technique works:

The technique is actually quite simple. All you need is 1x2 bricks and 1x1 round bricks to make the entire wall. Start with a line of bricks and rounds alternating (one brick, one round, one brick, one round and so on. You'll want to go at LEAST 8 or 9 bricks with rounds in between for the first layer. You can always add more later once you get a hang of the pattern). You'll then make your next layer on top of that by off setting the alternating bricks one stud to either the left or right (your choice, it doesn't matter). Then repeat the process for a third layer. Once you've got the third layer finished, take a look at what you have. You should have a diagonal line of rounds going up (in whichever direction you chose) to one side reapeated throughout the "wall." From here it's simple repetition of the same technique over and over until you've got the end result of what size you want. Once you have the size you're looking for, you can then take the wall and "bend it" to your will. Don't try using telekenisis for this 'cause it won't work, you have to actually bend the wall using your hands. If you get a wall of sufficient size, you'll find that the end result is actually quite flexible and can be bent in to numerous angles. Of course, it IS still Lego and there are some limitations, but as you can see by my Atlantis moc, you can still put some pretty good torque on it and it'll stay nicely.

Permalink
| June 5, 2010, 7:40 pm
That is a popular design. One thing I have loved for its smoothness is just stacking 1x2s in a brick pattern. After a while you should be able to bend this wall. I is smooth and realistic but the only drawback is the number of bricks it takes. :(
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| June 5, 2010, 7:55 pm
Quoting Pony Lord7
I always thout that that was rather self explanitory but I guess there is always a mob of people who nead it spelled out to them.


We'd all like to think that, but it's the one thing I get asked about most. I was just reminded of it on eurobricks a few minutes ago with 3 (count them THREE) PM's on the subject asking for details on how to do it.

So I just thought I'd put it out there in case anyone was wondering.
Permalink
| June 5, 2010, 7:55 pm
Quoting Blake Baer
That is a popular design. One thing I have loved for its smoothness is just stacking 1x2s in a brick pattern. After a while you should be able to bend this wall. I is smooth and realistic but the only drawback is the number of bricks it takes. :(


I've never tried it myself, but I also heard that 1x3 bricks work the same in that fashion when wanting to curve a wall... may need to try that sometime.

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| June 5, 2010, 7:57 pm
Quoting Blake Baer
That is a popular design. One thing I have loved for its smoothness is just stacking 1x2s in a brick pattern. After a while you should be able to bend this wall. I is smooth and realistic but the only drawback is the number of bricks it takes. :(

I have tried this in the past and like it, but I think it damages the lego and they are not the same after.
Permalink
| June 23, 2010, 8:53 am
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