MOCpages : Share your LEGO® creations
LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop The Fellowship of the BrickLord of the Rings
Welcome to the world's greatest LEGO fan community!
Explore cool creations, share your own, and have lots of fun together.  ~  It's all free!
Conversation »
Silmarillion
Join to comment
I actually find it better than Lord of the Rings.

I need a little help though, can somebody please provide me with the english version of Beren's poem for Luthien? I am not sure how it was supposed to be translated and I think that it does not give elven version justice, so it needs to be redone by someone (me).
Permalink
| July 20, 2012, 3:38 am
 Group admin 
The leaves were long, the grass was green,
The hemlock-umbels tall and fair,
And in the glade a light was seen
Of stars in shadow shimmering.
Tinúviel was dancing there
To music of a pipe unseen,
And light of stars was in her hair,
And in her raiment glimmering.

There Beren came from mountains cold,
And lost he wandered under leaves,
And where the Elven-river rolled
He walked alone and sorrowing.
He peered between the hemlock-leaves
And saw in wonder flowers of gold
Upon her mantle and her sleeves,
And her hair like shadow following.

Enchantment healed his weary feet
That over hills were doomed to roam;
And forth he hastened, strong and fleet,
And grasped at moonbeams glistening.
Through woven woods in Elvenhome
She lightly fled on dancing feet,
And left him lonely still to roam
In the silent forest listening.

He heard there oft the flying sound
Of feet as light as linden-leaves,
Or music welling underground,
In hidden hollows quavering.
Now withered lay the hemlock-sheaves,
And one by one with sighing sound
Whispering fell the beachen leaves
In the wintry woodland wavering.

He sought her ever, wandering far
Where leaves of years were thickly strewn,
By light of moon and ray of star
In frosty heavens shivering.
Her mantle glinted in the moon,
As on a hill-top high and far
She danced, and at her feet was strewn
A mist of silver quivering.

When winter passed, she came again,
And her song released the sudden spring,
Like rising lark, and falling rain,
And melting water bubbling.
He saw the elven-flowers spring
About her feet, and healed again
He longed by her to dance and sing
Upon the grass untroubling.

Again she fled, but swift he came.
Tinúviel! Tinúviel!
He called her by her elvish name;
And there she halted listening.
One moment stood she, and a spell
His voice laid on her: Beren came,
And doom fell on Tinúviel
That in his arms lay glistening.

As Beren looked into her eyes
Within the shadows of her hair,
The trembling starlight of the skies
He saw there mirrored shimmering.
Tinúviel the elven-fair,
Immortal maiden elven-wise,
About him cast her shadowy hair
And arms like silver glimmering.

Long was the way that fate them bore,
O'er stony mountains cold and grey,
Through halls of ireon and darkling door,
And woods of nightshade morrowless.
The Sundering Seas between them lay,
And yet at last they met once more,
And long ago they passed away
In the forest singing sorrowless.
Permalink
| July 20, 2012, 4:25 am
Actually, I was refering to the poem specifically created by Beren at the Taur-nu-Fuin, shortly after he left Luthien Tinuviel to fulfill his promise of returning a Silmaril.
Permalink
| July 21, 2012, 4:41 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Deus Otiosus
Actually, I was refering to the poem specifically created by Beren at the Taur-nu-Fuin, shortly after he left Luthien Tinuviel to fulfill his promise of returning a Silmaril.

This should be correct now:

There still sat Beren, and he sang, and loud his lonely singing rang. Though Orc should hear, or wolf a-prowl, or any of the creatures foul within a shade that slunk and stared of Taur-na-Fuin, nought he cared, who now took leave of light and day, grim-hearted, bitter, fierce and fey.


Farewell now here, ye leaves of trees, your music in the morning breeze! Farewell now blade and bloom and grass that see the changing seasons pass; ye waters murmuring over stone, and meres that silent stand alone! Farewell now mountain, vale, and plain! Farewell now wind and frost and rain, and mist and cloud, and heaven's air; ye star and moon so blinding-fair that still shall look down from the sky on the wide earth, though Beren die— though Beren die not, and yet deep, deep, whence comes of those that weep no dreadful echo, lie and choke in everlasting dark and smoke. 'Farewell sweet earth and northern sky, for ever blest, since here did lie, and here with lissom limbs did run, beneath the moon, beneath the sun, Lúthien Tinúviel more fair than mortal tongue can tell. Though all to ruin fell the world, and were dissolved and backward hurled unmade into the old abyss, yet were its making good, for this— the dawn, the dusk, the earth, the sea— that Lúthien on a time should be.
Permalink
| July 22, 2012, 4:30 am
Quoting Michael Kringe
This should be correct now:

There still sat Beren, and he sang, and loud his lonely singing rang. Though Orc should hear, or wolf a-prowl, or any of the creatures foul within a shade that slunk and stared of Taur-na-Fuin, nought he cared, who now took leave of light and day, grim-hearted, bitter, fierce and fey.


Farewell now here, ye leaves of trees, your music in the morning breeze! Farewell now blade and bloom and grass that see the changing seasons pass; ye waters murmuring over stone, and meres that silent stand alone! Farewell now mountain, vale, and plain! Farewell now wind and frost and rain, and mist and cloud, and heaven's air; ye star and moon so blinding-fair that still shall look down from the sky on the wide earth, though Beren die— though Beren die not, and yet deep, deep, whence comes of those that weep no dreadful echo, lie and choke in everlasting dark and smoke. 'Farewell sweet earth and northern sky, for ever blest, since here did lie, and here with lissom limbs did run, beneath the moon, beneath the sun, Lúthien Tinúviel more fair than mortal tongue can tell. Though all to ruin fell the world, and were dissolved and backward hurled unmade into the old abyss, yet were its making good, for this— the dawn, the dusk, the earth, the sea— that Lúthien on a time should be.

Thank you. That translator that worked on Silmarillion does not appear to be much of a poet... Much to differ from the almost adequate skills of Tolkien, but the latter was noticably more talented for literature too.
Permalink
| July 22, 2012, 6:35 am
I am reading it... It is interesting...
Permalink
| October 10, 2012, 2:34 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting Daniel Henson
I am reading it... It is interesting...

I can highly reccomend it. Sometimes it's hard to understand, but after you're done with it you'll know everything about the past times of Middle Earth.
Permalink
| October 11, 2012, 4:03 am
 Group moderator 
Quoting Daniel Henson
I am reading it... It is interesting...


I need to start reading it...
Permalink
| October 11, 2012, 1:30 pm
 Group moderator 
Quoting Justin M

I need to start reading it...

So do I :P
Permalink
| October 11, 2012, 2:11 pm
 Group admin 
Quoting ~ Caleb ~ (B-day Oct. 21)
So do I :P

It's awesome! I must warn you though: Almost everyone who plays a role in the book dies.
Permalink
| October 12, 2012, 4:43 am
 Group moderator 
Quoting ~ Caleb ~ (B-day Oct. 21)
So do I :P


Then we can be reading buddies! :P
Permalink
| October 12, 2012, 12:53 pm
Quoting Deus Otiosus
I actually find it better than Lord of the Rings.

I need a little help though, can somebody please provide me with the english version of Beren's poem for Luthien? I am not sure how it was supposed to be translated and I think that it does not give elven version justice, so it needs to be redone by someone (me).

they should make a movie(s)
Permalink
| November 14, 2012, 6:44 pm
Quoting Daniel Henson
they should make a movie(s)

I have been of these very thoughts for four years now - that is from when I first read the book. They could make a movie for each larger story (but Quenta Silmarillion should be made a hexology at least) or something... It is a challenge.
Permalink
| November 15, 2012, 9:26 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Justin M

I need to start reading it...

I started it and got about a third of the way through, but I have many other things to read so I stopped for a time, I will hopefully start it again soon.
Permalink
| November 15, 2012, 10:00 am
The Silmarillion is my second favorite book after The Hobbit and is, in my opinion, far better than the Lord of the Rings. I've been reading George R.R. Martin's "A Clash of Kings" but every day or two I read an excerpt from the Silmarillion; I'm on Turin Turambar, at the moment, and his is an especially interesting journey.

I agree : Quenta Silmarillion itself could make for at least three films though it wouldn't do to make any single part of the story and leave any other out.
Permalink
| January 25, 2013, 1:51 am
I haven't read it and I do not own it. I want to read it SO BAD. I just read "Sir Gaiwan and the Green Knight" By Tolkien. It has 3 poems in all: Sir Gaiwan, Something, and Something (I forgot because I had to return it to the library XD. The poems are about 50 pages each.
Permalink
| January 25, 2013, 8:02 am
 Group moderator 
Quoting Ryan "Ronin" Dragonslayer
The Silmarillion is my second favorite book after The Hobbit and is, in my opinion, far better than the Lord of the Rings. I've been reading George R.R. Martin's "A Clash of Kings" but every day or two I read an excerpt from the Silmarillion; I'm on Turin Turambar, at the moment, and his is an especially interesting journey.

I agree : Quenta Silmarillion itself could make for at least three films though it wouldn't do to make any single part of the story and leave any other out.

Right? Doesnt Turin kill himself or is that someone else? I skimmed through The children of Hurin.
Permalink
| January 25, 2013, 8:49 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Chris .
Right? Doesnt Turin kill himself or is that someone else? I skimmed through The children of Hurin.

No, Turin marries a girl, but doesn't know that it is his own sister. I can't remember anyone who killed himself.
Permalink
| January 25, 2013, 9:45 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Ryan "Ronin" Dragonslayer
The Silmarillion is my second favorite book after The Hobbit and is, in my opinion, far better than the Lord of the Rings. I've been reading George R.R. Martin's "A Clash of Kings" but every day or two I read an excerpt from the Silmarillion; I'm on Turin Turambar, at the moment, and his is an especially interesting journey.

I agree : Quenta Silmarillion itself could make for at least three films though it wouldn't do to make any single part of the story and leave any other out.

Finally someone who agrees with me! The Hobbit is my favorite book too, then The Silmarillion and then LOTR.
Permalink
| January 25, 2013, 9:47 am
 Group admin 
Quoting Sam .
I haven't read it and I do not own it. I want to read it SO BAD. I just read "Sir Gaiwan and the Green Knight" By Tolkien. It has 3 poems in all: Sir Gaiwan, Something, and Something (I forgot because I had to return it to the library XD. The poems are about 50 pages each.

J.R.R. Tolkien did not actually write Sir Gwain and Green knight, he is often credited to it though because he translated it from it's original language.
Permalink
| January 25, 2013, 12:31 pm
Quoting Mark Murphy
J.R.R. Tolkien did not actually write Sir Gwain and Green knight, he is often credited to it though because he translated it from it's original language.

Hmm cool fact; I hadn't heard that yet and my sister even took a Tolkien literature class in college.
Permalink
| January 26, 2013, 1:18 am
 Group moderator 
Quoting Mark Murphy
J.R.R. Tolkien did not actually write Sir Gwain and Green knight, he is often credited to it though because he translated it from it's original language.


Very neat. I actually have never heard that before.
Permalink
| January 26, 2013, 4:38 pm
Other topics
Your LoTR collection Updated yesterday
General Conversation IX Updated yesterday
Ask the Admins Updated yesterday
Costume Party Updated yesterday
LOTR Word Association Updated Wednesday



LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop The Fellowship of the BrickLord of the Rings


You Your home page | LEGO creations | Favorite builders
Activity Activity | Comments | Creations
Explore Explore | Recent | Groups
MOCpages is an unofficial, fan-created website. LEGO® and the brick configuration are property of The LEGO Group, which does not sponsor, own, or endorse this site.
©2002-2014 Sean Kenney Design Inc | Privacy policy | Terms of use