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Real Flying Lego Rockets Use Real Rocket Motors!
These Lego rockets really fly using REAL rocket motors! They crash into the earth and can be reflown over and over!
About this creation






These three Lego rockets can really fly using REAL rocket motors! I've flown the smallest (21-1/4" tall) rocket three times using Estes C6-7 and D12-7 motors (shown here). The rocket is boosted several hundred feet into the air, but (since Lego makes no parachute) it comes crashing back to the earth as a "lawn dart"! Reassembly is easy, since the tough Lego ABS plastic is really hard to break. The bottom of the white Lego rocket fins do get a bit scorched, however. Recommend using a 7-second delay on your Estes motors (instead of the standard 5 seconds) so that the black powder ejection charge goes off AFTER the rocket is already in pieces on the ground.

The rocket uses lots of #2462 Modified Facet Bricks (3x3) sandwiched between the #30062 Modified 6x6 Octagonal Open-Center Plates.





The second (31-1/4" tall) rocket uses 38mm High Power Rocket reload motors. A reloadable motor casing is shown next to the cavernous bottom opening. The launch rod lugs are clear #2850 Lego Technic Engine Cylinders. Again, there is no parachute so the rocket has a "bucket recovery" (i.e., you collect the pieces in a bucket after it spears the earth!)

This MOC uses larger, #6063 Modified 10x10 Octagonal Open-Center Plates sandwiched between larger, #6107 Modified Facet 5x5 Bricks. An octagonal plate is shown lying to the right of the rocket.







The third rocket is made mostly of #6055 Wall Panels (6x6x6 Corner with Window) -- the same as on Lego Castle sets. The rocket fins and launch lugs are attached through the windows with Technic Axles and #32016 Lego Technic Angled Connectors (#3 size, 157.5 degrees). The last photo shows the connectors inside the wall panels -- they have a "spring-loaded" effect and are very strong.

The top of the blue-and-black rocket has huge, orange #2409 "Panel 10 x 10 x 12 Quarter Dome (Corner for 10 x 6 x 11)" pieces.

Lego Digital Designer (LDD) 3.1 building instructions for the small rocket appears below. The instructions for the medium-sized rocket pictured here is available on my Brickshelf folder http://www.brickshelf.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?m=dluders .


Building instructions
Download building instructions (LEGO Digital Designer)

Comments

 I like it 
  June 17, 2012
I'll try to make one...
 I like it 
  June 5, 2012
Amazing! That's an awesome way to let Lego Fly! Looking forward to your video.
 I like it 
  November 22, 2011
Thanks for sharing this. My son asked me about a launchable LEGO rocket and I told him I thought it was not possible, but then after he went to bed I wondered, researched and ended up on this page. We built the smallest of these a few weeks back and launched her twice. The first time we used a C-motor, and the rocket only went up about 40 ft. before it turned and returned to the ground. The we tried the D12-7 and got a much more impressive launch (that ended up in the woods!). Ultimately, we lost about 12 pieces of LEGO - all of which we had replacements for. In the spring we'll give it another try with the Ds in a larger field.
 I made it 
  October 30, 2011
I don't know how much they weigh; I don't have a scale. The smaller rocket flies about 350 feet. The larger rocket has never flown, mainly because all High-Power Rockets must be inspected at National Association of Rocketry (NAR)-sanctioned launches and it does not have a parachute! I'm going to design a new, Lego Technic rocket (with internal bracing to keep the various bricks together) so that I can add a parachute and fly it at NAR events. I may have to use several Lego Pirates sails and lots of wadding to protect the 'chutes from melting in heat of the motor's ejection charge.
 I like it 
  October 14, 2011
Awesome! How much do your rockets weigh? Could you give me a guess at how high an Estes engine push your Lego rocket? Did you ever consider making your own custom parchute/recovery system for your Lego Rockets?
 I made it 
  January 31, 2011
No, the rocket does not break up in the air; it comes down intact as a ballistic "lawn dart" and smashes into the ground. It is easily repaired, however, since Lego bricks are tough!
 I like it 
  January 31, 2011
reallycool creations when you lunche it it brakes in the air?,, anyway if you have time can you comment an my creations tnx!!!
 I like it 
  June 6, 2010
Excellent work!
 I made it 
  April 25, 2009
Quoting TrueJedi25 Commando That is really amazing!! good job. I always thought that the plastic would melt pretty easily but i guess not. really cool!
Regarding the small rocket, the white Lego slopes acting as rocket fins DID GET SCORCHED when I did not provide an adequate "standoff" above the Estes launcher's blast plate. By using a LONG delay motor (like a 7-second delay D12-7), the rocket returns to the earth and breaks up into the component pieces BEFORE the ejection charge has a chance to scorch the inside of the rocket. Obviously, one must be careful not to do this in dry grass lest a fire start on the ground. If the fins or other pieces get too dirty or banged up, just switch them out with replacement pieces since NOTHING IS GLUED -- everything's a friction-fit!
 I like it 
  April 24, 2009
That is really amazing!! good job. I always thought that the plastic would melt pretty easily but i guess not. really cool!
  March 27, 2009
Cool! Thanks for the responce! I sure appriciate it!
 I made it 
  March 15, 2009
Quoting Commander Dav Wow this is really creative. I really wish that I could make something like this with my LEGOs since I am into Estes rockets. Great work!!! PS: Do they use the Estes Parachutes or streamers or do they use something else?
Well, like I said, the rockets simply fall straight to the earth without parachute. Obviously, this is not ideal for NAR-sactioned launches :) . The flimsy plastic Estes parachutes wouldn't handle the weight of these rockets. There are nylon chutes that one can get off of eBay, but there's a problem of how to STOW the parachute inside the rocket. The Lego bricks are tightly bound together, and the rockets are one-piece. I wanted to keep all of these rockets 100% Lego (except for the motors). I suppose one could insert a cardboard tube inside the Lego modified plates to provide a SMOOTH surface for the parachute to get pushed out by the motor ejection charge. The black powder residue does tend to mar (and slightly melt) the Lego ABS plastic over time. The top of the rocket could be made into a two-piece deal, whereby the tube connects the two parts and Lego TILES are used to prevent the bricks from interlocking. Here's how to make your own STABLE rocket: 1) Make a cardboard cutout of the rocket's silhouette. Balance this cutout on a ruler, and mark the balance point. This is the "Center of Pressure". 2) Balance your real rocket model on a ruler (with the motors and parachutes installed!), and note the balance point. This is the "Center of Gravity." 3) The rocket will fly stable if the Center of Gravity is one-body-diameter ABOVE (ahead of) the Center of Pressure. If you need to adjust, make your fins bigger or move your weight upwards (forward).
 I like it 
  March 14, 2009
Wow this is really creative. I really wish that I could make something like this with my LEGOs since I am into Estes rockets. Great work!!! PS: Do they use the Estes Parachutes or streamers or do they use something else?
 
By David Luders
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LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Real Flying Lego Rockets Use Real Rocket Motors!Spacecraft


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