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Mornington Asylum
About this creation
A history in pictures of the asylum. The building itself is made out of plates rather than bricks to give a more textured appearance. The inside walls are the same to give the appearance of tiles which are common within asylums in England. Each picture below gives a fictional history of the asylum. Your reviews are appreciated. Thanks.

A History of Mornington Asylum 1842-2005



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   The brainchild for the asylum was William Mornington, a Gloucester entrepreneur who saw a rise in crime by the insane and, with the help of the local parish, built Mornington Asylum. Construction began in 1840 and was finished two years later in 1842



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   Dedication Day = March 9th 1842. At the far left of the picture is William Mornington (sporting his favourite hat). The governor placed in charge of the asylu, Dr Joseph Watson, is at the front of the photograph and on the left. Shortly after dedication William Mornington suddenly died and Watson took over the asylum



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   Another picture of the dedication day. This picture later appeared in 'A History of Crime and it's Buildings'



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   1843 = The asylum recieves thousands of inmates every year. To the public and the parish of Gloucester it was a place to treat those who needed help. Nobody could have guessed what was really happening inside



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   It was behind these walls, with the guttering and ordinary-looking lights that the true horrors were occuring.



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   This is the admissions desk on the ground floor, just inside the asylum. Watson's nurse, Emily Routledge, handled admissions as well as surgery. Once admitted, few left alive.



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   The Operating Theatre on the ground floor. Taken in 1844 this was a secret photograph taken by one of Watson's associates. The asylum was a pretence for Watson and Routledge to commit their evil crimes. All types of unnecessary procedures were carried out on inmates who were unknowing guinea pigs. This unfortunate patient is soon to undergo a frontal lobotomy



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   Dr Joseph Watson (1810-1865). Watson was one of the most prolific serial killers of the nineteenth century. The Mornington Asylum and the thousands of inmates he tested procedures on are legend.



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   His nurse, Emily Routledge. Her innocent appearance and personality masked the true nature of her evil. She would assist Watson in almost all of his procedures. Here in a photograph taken in 1844 she is preparing for a frontal lobotomy



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   On the second floor a large padded cell was constructed by Watson himself to test the limits of isolation. The initial asylum did not have a room of this size but Watson was keen to examine the possibility of isolating two inmates to see if they would eventually kill each other



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   On September 19th 1865 Joseph Watson prepared for another day at the asylum. He had been pondering for days over new procedures and had an inmate he wanted to test it on in the padded cell.



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   However, in a day that exposed Watson and his asylum, the inmate escaped from the padded cell.



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   He stormed into Watson's office and stabbed him in the neck with a surgical instrument Watson had intended to use on the escaped inmate



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   Desperate for freedom and driven mad by months of isolation the inmate, John Hughes, released all of the other inmates who began to massacre the asylum staff



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   Routledge attempted to escape down the stairs beside the operating theatre but Hughes and others killed her and pushed her down the narrow staircase



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   Unable to escape from the prison-like building Hughes knocked over equipment in the theatre and a fire started. With the asylum isolated from the nearest town the fire went unchecked and the building was burnt out, trapping all the inmates inside. Over 300 people, including all the staff and inmates, were killed.



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   It was only when the fire was put out and the asylum examined that the true horrors were discovered. Bodies were discovered throughout the structure, some had been experimented on, some were more fortunate. All, though, had been unable to escape.



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   The asylum was refurbished after the Second World War and reopened as part of an NHS building in the 1960s. Lack of funds and its isolated position meant that it was ill-equipped to serve as a useful hospital and the building was condemned and abandoned in 1979.



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   Today the building remains with all the 1970s equipment remaining. Some of Watson's original papers and equipment survives in the building.



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   The operating theatre remains as it did in the nineteenth century, unaffected by the fire thanks to the thick walls protecting it.



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   The admissions office was never refurbishment after the fire and remains fire-damaged. The very same lamp that hung from the ceiling when Routledge sat behind the desk is still there...



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   ...As is the padded cell, the door has since collapsed. Many features of the building remain...



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   ...including Watson's office. His office was destroyed in the fire but the new manager kept a similar layout including an almost identical lamp on the desk. The office was closed in 1974 and moved to a different part of the building.



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   Today the sunlight still pierces through the building, shining into empty corridors. After the NHS left the hospital signs were removed from walls but the plates that held them still hang on the walls



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   As does this sign by Watson's office. It was this very corridor that John Hughes, the escaped inmate, walked down before killing Nurse Routledge.



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   A corridor between the padded cell and Watson's office. This large window saw several deaths as inmates jumped when the inferno reached this part of the building



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   Today the building is empty. Signs are placed at the asylum's gates warning of trespass and few return to the building. There have been talks of restoring it as a museum but for the moment the building stands empty, foreboding and silent.



Comments

 I like it 
  July 12, 2013
Wow! The backstories you put on your great builds are the best I've seen on MOCpages! I have to say, this story is almost too creepy and realistic for a Lego website!
 I like it 
  March 4, 2012
I don't suppose they made cupcakes there to?
 I like it 
  October 12, 2010
This is just wild. This is a great story to go with really masterful building. I like the black and white photos. My experience with trying to do these period photos in that you need to adjust the color temperature too and not just covert to black and white. It looks like you figured that out because these photos look good. The only thing they need is to be grainy and I have not figured out that trick yet. Darn digital cameras even make the 1800's look good.
R H
 I like it 
Patrick Leon
  October 8, 2008
SCARY!!!
 I like it 
  March 15, 2008
wow that is creepy! i am a fan of asylums and there creepy feel. when i first looked at that page i thought it was a real asylum. i did some research and found out it wasnt. nice moc though. can i please have instructions for it? please?
 I like it 
  February 15, 2008
woah! is this a true story? i googled all the doctors and an't find anything. pleez respond!
 I like it 
  November 10, 2007
One of the details I especially like is the difference between the onld 1800's photos and the more modern ones. Very well written.
 I like it 
  November 2, 2007
Very ominous and spooky! I love it. Excellent design with some great interior detailing. Looks great.
R H
Mitchell L.
  October 27, 2007
Cool design and storyline. I thought the madman in the white clothing smiling in the cell was pretty funny :D Very creative, never would have ever thought of a Lego asylum. Pretty cool.
 I like it 
  September 15, 2007
Kudos on the plates vs bricks, makes it look very realistic, and the story creates a really good atmosphere. A++
 I like it 
  November 21, 2006
kool
 I like it 
  August 18, 2006
Wow this ACTUALLY creeped me out with the backstory and all!And im the kinda guy who dreams up nasty gruesome stuff!Keep up the good work!!!!!!!!!!!!
 I like it 
  July 28, 2006
The plates really do add to the realism. Very deep backstory.
 I like it 
  July 6, 2006
Fantastic Moc. The plate techniques really does help add realism. The individual rooms are filled with detail, and the back story adds a ton of depth. Excellent work.
 I like it 
  July 4, 2006
Awesome.
 I like it 
  March 17, 2006
Wow.....Stunning. The sepia tone and crooked pictures make it seem so much more real than it actually is. A brilliant MOC ~ Mizz Thorne.
 I like it 
  January 8, 2006
WHOAH!! nice spooky story. good model! Nice pics and as Paul Brass... said, who DOESN'T love a good frontal labotomy?!?!?
 I like it 
  December 11, 2005
A chiller masterpiece: a simple moc, endowed with life by such dramatic phototaking skills and storyline. The Mornington Asylum boldy set the stage for a horror genre in the literature of LEGO. The dim-lighted photo effects that undermine the quality of the rest of your MOCs are finally put to good use in the Asylum, and the slanted camera angles brilliantly convey the tone of insanity while the sepia toned pics add to the drama and realism. This is one of the best entries on MOCpages. -Nannan
 I like it 
  December 11, 2005
Amazing story telling g! This is great! The photography is excellent... love the story. Falling down stairs, experimentation, and who doesn't love a good frontal lobotamy! Woot! Enjoyed this! I didn't know lego mocs could be so creepy! Cheers! ~ Paul.
 I like it 
  December 11, 2005
Creepy story! I like the plate construction and the "historic" sepia toned photos. Good details as well.
 
By R H
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Added December 11, 2005
 


LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Mornington AsylumBuildings


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