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NAIA Orbit
Please allow me to introduce to you a renovative, environmentally-green, clean, quiet, fast, and efficient aircraft with a snazzy, smooth, curvy, sexy look to boot
About this creation

NAIA Islandasia is proud to unveil a beautiful turboprop aircraft, the Orbit.

In recent times I have studied how the Lego Company’s LC-7893 aircraft might realistically compare to an actual aircraft through its scale compared to minifigures. Though set #7893 makes a good toy, if you realistically compare its size to a minifigure, you will find that it’s actually no bigger than a commuter prop-liner, possibly an ERJ-145 or even an EMB-190 at the very most. From what I can tell, the overall shape and approximate size of the body relates very well to that of the Bombardier Dash 8 and its variants. With the Dash 8 as a design model, I began fashioning a Lego over-wing twin-turboprop airplane of my own.

The Orbit is your typical mid-range turboprop airliner. The first developed model of the Orbit was the ORB-100, with 24 seats in a 2-class, 1+1 seating arrangement, and 26 seats in a 1-class, 1+1 seating arrangement. If the fuselage had been designed by the Lego Company to be at least two studs wider and taller, the seating capacity and cargo capacity might actually be worth a comparison with an actual aircraft, such as the Dash 8.

The Orbit is your typical mid-range turboprop airliner. The first developed model of the Orbit was the ORB-100, with 24 seats in a 2-class, 1+1 seating arrangement, and 26 seats in a 1-class, 1+1 seating arrangement. If the fuselage had been designed by the Lego Company to be at least two studs wider and taller, the seating capacity and cargo capacity might actually be worth a comparison with an actual aircraft, such as the Dash 8.

Here are some benefits you can receive from operating the Orbit in your airline:

• Overhead wings increase, thus improve, seating capacity and legroom
• Raised engines reduce ground noise and debris engine intake
• Turboprop engines reduce noise, maintenance, and drag
• Turboprops enable wide operational variations
• Turboprops increase fuel efficiency and decrease weight
• Turboprops – typically small ones – can theoretically run on shorter runways than other same-sized Lego aircraft currently in operation
• Because of reduced weight, more cargo can be accommodated
• The Orbit will be easier to fly and feature more reliable electronics, thus making training courses only 2 weeks long
• Electronic heating and cooling systems allow safe operation through fog, dust, and ice
• Easy assembly reduces production delays and cuts prices
• Better performance, cost, and fuel efficiency reduces operational costs





The first Orbit was completed on April 4, 2008. Though the aircraft’s seating capacity is incomparably sufficient to other current aircraft, the aircraft’s size and wingspan was 15% larger than I expected it to be.

Some difficulties, however, have been encountered since its release in 2008. Since the main landing gear is directly attached to the wing, when the aircraft is on the ground it puts enormous pressure on the wing and poses a possibility of breaking.

The first Orbit was completed an entire month sooner than I thought it would be. The roll-out ceremony and inaugural flight down my hallway took place on April 5, 2008. The first Orbit, registered MA-9009 in BriksAir colors, was introduced to the public at Winglet’s testing airfield after being painted the previous day. 130 people including Bricksburg’s mayor turned out to see the aircraft. After giving the inaugural speech, the designing and production company’s CEO and President Stephen Abbott christened the aircraft before its inaugural flight at 6:08 P.M.

The first Orbit was a model ORB-100. Future model variations will not have different dimensions, just different interiors. When questioned by news reporters, NAIA Administrator Stephen Abbott explained that “Using the fuselage pieces from the Lego Company’s set #7893 limits alteration to length alone, and there is no logical reason to alter the length without changing anything else. Shortened variations will not be introduced because a capacity of less than 20 passengers is productively undesirable for such a large fuselage, and for safety reasons we want the aircraft to remain with at least two entryways.”

Instead, a number of interior variations ranging from 20 to 26 seats have been designed. Though no freight versions have been discussed up to this point, amphibious and VIP variants are under consideration. Two military variants of the NAIA Orbit, the Orbit MIA (Military Intelligence Aircraft) Transport and the Orbit MIA Reconnaissance, are currently in production and available to military agencies across the Lego world. The Orbit ORB-100B was introduced at the same time as the ORB-100. It offered a single-class interior design which maximized the passenger accommodation to 26 without changing the plane’s dimensions.
The Orbit 100 and 100B have proved to be slightly vulnerable to landing impact due to a weak wing-to-fuselage infrastructure. Because the rear landing gear is attached directly to the wing, too much impact may cause the wings to break loose from the fuselage and drop the fuselage onto the pavement. Such an event has occurred twice since the Orbit’s release in 2008. As a result, NAIA is currently designing an improved Orbit (the Orbit 200) which will feature a better and stronger infrastructure to avoid such issues occurring again.

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The NAIA Orbit MIA Transport is proudly operated by an association known as MarineAircraft.
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Photo Gallery

I took this MOC as an opportunity to practice my photography skills as well. :)






















The Orbit also features real flashing LED lights and miniature headlights.























Wing flaps



















The Orbit next to my attempt at a replica of a Douglas DC-3. It has its own MOCpage that you can see here.







The following pictures are from The Orbit's release, shortly before the inaugural flight













Thanks for joining me to witness the arrival of The Orbit to the face of MOCpages.





THIS PAGE IS APPROVED BY THE
NATIONAL AEROSPACE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY OF ISLANDASIA





Comments

 I like it 
  July 20, 2009
Good Im concidering a version 2 for Marine Aircraft
 I made it 
  July 18, 2009
Quoting Steffen Kasteleiner Very nice, Stephen! The pieces you used for the leading edge look great. I love the big wingspan, and that it has high wings and a T-tail. High wings just generally look better to me, and more special since most planes have low wings. I also really like that you placed the wings relatively far in the back of the fuselage. A very nice, new plane of yours - thanks for letting me know! Do you have pics of the airport layout you were talking about, BTW? I´d love to see that... Best regards, Steffen
Hey, thank you very much Steffen. About the airport, unfortunantly my computer had an "accident" and I lost all of the photos of it except a few. Of course, the airport is no longer built, so I don't have very much to work with to come up with a very impressive MOC . . . but I'll be sure to post what's left anyway ;) Thanks again
 I made it 
  July 18, 2009
Quoting Elite Marshal: Evan Ehrenberg, Supreme Commander of the 550th The LEDs are a nice touch, and the over all shape of it is wonderful. I also like the red coloring on the back of the wings. The one thing I don't like are the trans blue bricks on the front of the wings, their a good touch, but because you already have red and white (as well as the black highlights and the yellow propellers), it just makes it look a bit too colorful. Just my opinion though, great MOC.
Yeah, I didn't have enough white 1x1 slopes . . . the only color piece I had in bulk was the clear blue (the Lego Company's City theme uses a WHOLE LOT of those babies!) Maybe someday when I get ambitious I'll check up on Bricklink and see if they have any that I can buy.
 I made it 
  July 18, 2009
Quoting Topsy Cret If you lend me that introduction, I can have the sentence shortened by Monday. Great little plane, better than planes I build. That's why I went to space - so much more freedom! Good day
Ha ha thanks. Do whatever you want :P
 I like it 
  July 17, 2009
The LEDs are a nice touch, and the over all shape of it is wonderful. I also like the red coloring on the back of the wings. The one thing I don't like are the trans blue bricks on the front of the wings, their a good touch, but because you already have red and white (as well as the black highlights and the yellow propellers), it just makes it look a bit too colorful. Just my opinion though, great MOC.
 I like it 
  July 17, 2009
Very nice, Stephen! The pieces you used for the leading edge look great. I love the big wingspan, and that it has high wings and a T-tail. High wings just generally look better to me, and more special since most planes have low wings. I also really like that you placed the wings relatively far in the back of the fuselage. A very nice, new plane of yours - thanks for letting me know! Do you have pics of the airport layout you were talking about, BTW? I´d love to see that... Best regards, Steffen
 I like it 
  July 17, 2009
If you lend me that introduction, I can have the sentence shortened by Monday. Great little plane, better than planes I build. That's why I went to space - so much more freedom! Good day
 
By Stephen Abbott
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