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Grumman-Harrelson 'Momma Lobster'
Well, I really admire whimsical creations. I've looked back at my stuff and none of it's really 'fun', so much as practical. That's boring. THIS, however, is fun. So without further adieu, I present the 'Momma Lobster'.
About this creation
*Ahem*
The Grumman-Harrleson design company first began the production of their signature war walker in 1800. They were not purchased by the British until 1809, and did not arrive in the Colonies until 1811. While the invention of the airship had allowed Britain to keep the colonials in check, they were quickly learning an aerial fleet cannot keep a settlement occupied, and the Marines deployed there were often left unprotected in Urban areas. The G-H walker solved that problem. While it was clumsy compared to modern walkers, the G-H was able to operate alongside infantry in urban environments and on patrols outside of a city. With a heavy caliber repeating cannon (While 2 shots every five seconds may not be much nowadays, it was a significant rate then) and a sheer intimidation factor on it's side, it was able to protect ground units from ambushes and provide support during. Because of it appeared to be caring for the redcoats almost like a mother, it was nicknamed the 'Momma Lobster' by the colonials. It continued to serve up until the British invasion of France due to it's inability to make the landings. In fact, the unit was highly susceptible to water damage and had difficulty in coastal areas. As of now, there are three units still in government service, but typically as members of fancy parades or educational events.
*Tap Tap* Is this thing on?

The pilot sat in a small wooden cockpit that was completely exposed to the elements. This left the driver vulnerable to sniper fire, while increasing visiblility. Later models would have a canopy installed to protect the pilot.
Well, this is a little bonus treat for all of you who notice it!

Another feature of the early models is the exposed mechanisms. Like the pilot, these were also incredibly vulnerable to enemy fire.
From now on, I'm going to try and use the alt text to deliver even more bad puns and poorly executed jokes.

The legs are also of a curious spindly design not found in modern machines. Historians believe it was made so to reduce the cost of production, and increase ease of transport. Note the pointed feet, which allowed it some maneuverability in rubble strewn areas.
Aren't you just giddy with excitement already?

The cannon was a new design that could fire two rounds ever five seconds, and utilized a drum for extra ammunition. It could carry sixty shots, and was usually accompanied by a horse and cart with extra drums. Exchange of ammunition was surprisingly easy, as each drum was pre-loaded.
Well, here goes: ... Shoot. Anybody got any ideas?

The rear of the walker housed a small boiler and pressure release system. With the burning of a newly discovered element in place of coal, the same amount of energy could be produced in half the space. Said element is referred to as 'Cavorite', and was first used to power airships.
Man this is worse than that time I went on vacation in Sweden. And that moose...

Here you can see boiler system up close. Below it is the flag mount and the clockwork system that moves the rear leg.
Y'know, my sister was bitten by that moose. It's true, she was engraving her initials in moose with the sharpened end of a toothbrush, when it attacked!

The rear foot is peculiarly clawed. Many historians believe this was used for any task requiring digging or the pulling down of a structure.
Speaking of mooses, I have a theory that swallows could carry coconuts to england. It's true! They could string it between them on a strand of creeper! Well, then again, it'd take an African Swallow to do that...

Here we see the unit in operation. As mentioned before, this early mech was incredibly clumsy and moved almost as a puppet would. A poorly controlled puppet, mind you.
We thoroughly apologize for this disastroys alternate text. The writer has been sacked.

Fourth Wall:
It feels good to build something whimsical. The backstory isn't, but the build is. Afterall, the internet is serious business, right? Anyways, I gave myself a challenge. That challenge was to build a fun-looking steampunk mech in place of one of the 'stricly practical' builds I usually do. So I did. I was inspired by Adrian Florea's Steam Cuirassier and the Combine Strider from HL2. Odd combination, no? Then again, you can't argue with the results though...
Well, thanks for stopping in guys! Please let me know what you think!



Comments

 I like it 
  March 19, 2010
Very nice Steampunkery! I love the look of the legs.
 I made it 
  March 19, 2010
That's a good bit more difficult than you'd think, especially when it's clanking about and breaking things. And do you mean wrapping the legs and odd gear thingies in some sort of protective cover to keep it dry?
 I like it 
  March 14, 2010
If the later canopy decreases visibility, then couldnt any good sniper shoot through the slit and splatter the pilot's br- oops, little kiddies... (gj. but why not have a super-extendomatron thingy for the legs for water?)
 I made it 
  March 12, 2010
Thanks! What anime was it? And as for the color scheme, I think this one's fine for now. Dark red and black would have been far more intimidating, but it really wouldn't have fit with in with Steampunk. That'd probably work better in a Dieselpunk creation, which is grittier and darker than the upbeat and cheery Steampunk.
 I like it 
  March 12, 2010
Very nice and it kinda reminds me of a war vehicle in an anime show. Too bad they probably dont make the right pieces to make this mostly black and dark red so it would look more like a devastating machine.
 I made it 
  March 11, 2010
I never really thought about that... But I can see the resemblance now. The front legs could be claws, and the back one the tail. As for the name, I'm afraid I don't have an answer for you there.
 I like it 
  March 11, 2010
The legs make it look like a lobster. Great job! BTW, why momma lobster, why not Momma Lobstaa? Just a question... ~Waff
 I made it 
  March 11, 2010
It's actually pretty stable. Tripedal mechs are inherently easier to balance than bipedal ones. Don't quote me on that though. And this is 100% lego. No off-brands, customs, or cheats in any way. It was built using quite a few clips though. Quite a few...
  March 11, 2010
That is really interesting. Looks very mechanical. How does it stay together? Is it just really sturdy, or have you cheated in some way? If I tried to build this, I think the Lobsterbacks would soon be motherless. (Speaking of which, I love the backstory. Very pseudo-authentic.) ;)
 I made it 
  March 11, 2010
Thank you, thank you both! @Sean: Oooh, shameless self-plug in the middle of praise! You get bonus points for that ;) And I'm glad the 'whimsical' effect works! @Nitrosity: Same, the hats are the best. From what I've seen, alot of Steampunk creations are strictly practical, and I myself have built quite a few of those. I prefer the more ridiculous side most of the time, mostly because it allows for color.
 I like it 
  March 10, 2010
really funny. i've always been a fan of those redcoats and their hats, so you get extra points for that. and it's a nice twist on the steampunk theme. i love the design, and the backstory is really good.
 I like it 
  March 10, 2010
That looks like it would be really entertaining to build. I couldn't help but laugh at the comical legs :D I have some steampunk stuff coming but its nothing to this.
 I made it 
  March 10, 2010
Thanks guys! @000: I don't know... I really don't. I never really have a plan for most of the builds, it just sort of happens... @Thomas: There really aren't many. It's either victorian era, an alternate universe, or western-esque times.
 I like it 
  March 10, 2010
Where do you get these ideas?
 I like it 
  March 10, 2010
Simply outstanding. Great take on the steampunk design, I love it. Very nice that it's from the War of 1812, I dont see many builds in that timeline....
 
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