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The Sinking of the Titanic (Includes Video)
The White Star Line Titanic sinking after colliding with an iceberg on April 14th-15th 1912
About this creation
The ill-fated liner on its maiden voyage.

Video of the sinking:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKSfL322AOQ

At 11:40 PM while sailing south of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, lookouts Frederick Fleet and Reginald Lee spotted a large iceberg directly ahead of the ship. Fleet sounded the ship's bell three times and telephoned the bridge. Sixth Officer Moody answered, "Yes, what do you see?", only to hear Fleet exclaiming, "Iceberg, right ahead!", to which Moody responded, "thank you", before informing First Officer Murdoch of the call. Murdoch (who had now already seen the iceberg) ordered an abrupt turn to port (left) and full speed astern, which stopped and then reversed the ship's reciprocating engines driving the wing propellers (the center shaft stopped as the turbine was not reversible. In reverse configuration the residual steam from the reciprocating engines was channeled directly to the condensers). A collision turned out to be inevitable, and the ship's starboard (right) side brushed the iceberg, buckling the hull in several places and popping out rivets below the waterline, creating a total of six leaks in the first five watertight compartments. Murdoch then ordered the ship hard right rudder which swung Titanic's stern away from the iceberg. The watertight doors were shut as water started filling the five compartments, one more than Titanic could stay afloat with. The weight of the compartments filling with water weighed the ship down past the top of the watertight bulkheads, allowing water to flow into the other compartments. Captain Smith, alerted by the jolt of the impact, arrived on the bridge and began to assess Titanic's situation. Following an inspection by the ship's officers, the ship's carpenter and Thomas Andrews, it was apparent that the Titanic would sink, and shortly after midnight on April 15, lifeboats were ordered to be readied and a distress signal sent out.

The first lifeboat launched, boat 7, was lowered shortly after 12:40 AM on the starboard side with only 28 people on board out of a maximum capacity of 65. The Titanic carried 20 lifeboats with a total capacity of 1,178 persons for the ship's total complement of passengers and crew of 2,223. Thirty-two lifeboats had been originally specified, but management decided the doubled-up boats spoiled the lines of the ship. Sixteen lifeboats, indicated by number, were in the davits; and four canvas-sided collapsibles, indicated by letter, stowed on the roof of the officers' quarters or on the forward Boat Deck to be launched in empty davits. While only enough space for a little more than half the passengers and crew, Titanic carried more boats than required by the British Board of Trade. At the time, the number of lifeboats required was determined by a ship's gross tonnage, rather than its human capacity. The regulations concerning lifeboat capacity had last been updated in 1894, when the largest ships afloat measured approximately 10,000 gross tons, compared to Titanic's 46,328 tons.

First and second-class passengers had easy access to the lifeboats with staircases that led right up to the boat deck, but third-class passengers found it much harder. Many found the corridors leading from the lower sections of the ship difficult to navigate and had trouble making their way up to the lifeboats. Some gates separating the third-class section of the ship from the other areas, like the one leading from the aft well deck to the second-class section, are known to have been locked. While the majority of first and second-class women and children survived the sinking, more third-class women and children were lost than saved.

Titanic reported its position as 4146N 5014W. The wreck was found at 4143N 4956W.Wireless operators Jack Phillips and Harold Bride were busy sending out distress signals. Several ships responded, including Mount Temple, Frankfurt and Titanic's sister ship, Olympic, but none were close enough to make it in time. The closest ship to respond was Cunard Line's RMS Carpathia, and at 58 nautical miles (107 km) away it would arrive in about four hours, still too late to get to Titanic in time. Two landCbased locations received the distress call from Titanic. One was the wireless station at Cape Race, Newfoundland, and the other was a Marconi telegraph station on top of the Wanamaker's department store in New York City.

From the bridge, the lights of a nearby ship could be seen off the port side. Since it was not responding to wireless, Fourth Officer Boxhall and Quartermaster Rowe attempted signaling the ship with a Morse lamp and later with distress rockets, but the ship never appeared to respond. The SS Californian was nearby but had stopped for the night because of ice, and its wireless was turned off because the wireless operator had gone to bed for the night. Just before he went to bed at around 11:00 PM Californian's radio operator attempted to warn Titanic that there was ice ahead, but he was cut off by an exhausted Jack Phillips, who sent back, "Shut up, shut up! I am busy, I am working Cape Race." When Californian's officers first saw the ship, they tried signaling it with their Morse lamp, but also never appeared to receive a response. Later, they noticed Titanic's distress signals over the lights and informed Captain Stanley Lord. Even though there was much discussion about the mysterious ship, which to the officers on duty appeared to be moving away before disappearing, Californian did not wake its wireless operator until morning.

At first, passengers were reluctant to leave the warm, well lit and ostensibly safe Titanic, which showed no outward signs of being in imminent danger, and board small, unlit, open lifeboats. This was one of the reasons most of the boats were launched partially empty. Also important was an uncertainty regarding the boats' structural integrity; it was feared that the boats might break if they were fully loaded before being set in the water. Captain Smith ordered the lifeboats be lowered half empty in the hope the boats would come back to save people in the water, and some boats were given orders to do just that. One boat, boat number one, meant to hold 40 people, left Titanic with only 12 people on board.

As the ship's tilt became more apparent, people started to become nervous, and some lifeboats began leaving fully loaded. "Women and children first" remained the imperative (see origin of phrase) for loading the boats. Shortly after 2:00 AM the waterline reached the bridge and forward boat deck, and all the lifeboats, save for the awkwardly located Collapsibles A and B, had been lowered. Collapsible D, with 44 of its 47 seats filled, was the last lifeboat to be lowered from the davits. The total number of vacancies was close to 475.

Around 2:10 AM, the stern rose out of the water, exposing the propellers, and the forward boat deck was flooding. The last two lifeboats floated right off the deck as the ocean reached them: collapsible lifeboat B upside down, and collapsible lifeboat A half-filled with water. Shortly afterwards the first funnel fell forward, crushing part of the bridge and many of those struggling in the water. On deck, people scrambled towards the stern or jumped overboard in hopes of reaching a lifeboat. As the ship's stern continued to slowly rise into the air, everything not secured crashed towards the bow. The electrical system finally failed and the lights, which had until now burned brightly, went out. Titanic's second funnel broke off and fell into the water, and Titanic herself tore apart.

Stress on the hull caused Titanic to break apart into two large pieces between the third and fourth funnels, and the bow section went completely under. The stern section briefly righted itself on the water before rising back up vertically. After a few moments, the stern section also sank into the ocean about two hours and forty minutes after the collision with the iceberg.

White Star attempted to persuade surviving crewmen not to state that the hull broke in half. The company believed that this information would cast doubts upon the integrity of their vessels. In fact, the stresses inflicted on the hull when it was almost vertical (bow down and stern in the air) were well beyond the design limits of the structure and no legitimate engineer could have fairly criticised the work of the shipbuilders in that regard.

Of a total of 2,223 people, only 706 survived; 1,517 perished. If the lifeboats were filled to capacity 1,178 people could have been saved. Of the First Class, 199 were saved (60%) and 130 died. Of the Second Class, 119 (44%) were saved and 166 were lost. Of the Third Class, 174 were saved (25%) and 536 perished. Of the crew, 214 were saved (24%) and 685 perished. 1,347 men (80%) died, and 103 women (26%) died. 53 children (about 50%) also died. Of particular note, the entire complement of the Engineering Department, remaining at their posts to keep the ship's electrical systems running, drowned. The majority of deaths were caused by victims succumbing to hypothermia in the 28 F (−2 C) water. Out of the 16 lifeboats and 4 collapsibles launched only one came back to the scene of the sinking to attempt to rescue survivors. Another boat helped. Lifeboat 4 was close by and picked up eight crewmen, two of whom later died. Close to an hour later, Lifeboat 14, under the command of Fifth Officer Harold Lowe, went back and rescued four people, one of whom died afterwards. Other people managed to climb onto the two collapsible lifeboats that floated off the deck. There were some arguments in some of the other lifeboats about going back, but many survivors were afraid of being swamped by people trying to climb into the lifeboat or being pulled down by the anticipated suction from the sinking ship, though this turned out not to be severe. Only 12 survivors were recovered from the water; "If the water was warmer, the people of Titanic would have had a chance.

As the ship sank into the depths, the two sections ended their final plunges very differently. The streamlined bow planed off approximately 2,000 feet (600 m) below the surface and slowed somewhat, landing relatively gently. The stern fell fairly straight down towards the ocean floor, possibly rotating as it sank, with the air trapped inside causing implosions. It was already half-crushed when it hit bottom at high speeds; the shock caused everything still loose to fall off. The bow section however, having been opened up by the iceberg and having sunk slowly, had little air left in it as it sank and therefore remained relatively intact during its descent.



Enlarge image
   Captain Smith, alerted by the jolt of the impact, arrived on the bridge and began to assess Titanic's situation. Following an inspection by the ship's officers, the ship's carpenter and Thomas Andrews, it was apparent that the Titanic would sink, and shortly after midnight on April 15, lifeboats were ordered to be readied and a distress signal sent out.



Enlarge image
   The watertight doors were shut as water started filling the five compartments, one more than Titanic could stay afloat with. The weight of the compartments filling with water weighed the ship down past the top of the watertight bulkheads, allowing water to flow into the other compartments.



Enlarge image
   First and second-class passengers had easy access to the lifeboats with staircases that led right up to the boat deck, but third-class passengers found it much harder. Many found the corridors leading from the lower sections of the ship difficult to navigate and had trouble making their way up to the lifeboats. Some gates separating the third-class section of the ship from the other areas, like the one leading from the aft well deck to the second-class section, are known to have been locked. While the majority of first and second-class women and children survived the sinking, more third-class women and children were lost than saved.



Enlarge image
   Wireless operators Jack Phillips and Harold Bride were busy sending out distress signals. Several ships responded, including Mount Temple, Frankfurt and Titanic's sister ship, Olympic, but none were close enough to make it in time. The closest ship to respond was Cunard Line's RMS Carpathia, and at 58 nautical miles (107 km) away it would arrive in about four hours



Enlarge image
   From the bridge, the lights of a nearby ship could be seen off the port side. Since it was not responding to wireless, Fourth Officer Boxhall and Quartermaster Rowe attempted signaling the ship with a Morse lamp and later with distress rockets, but the ship never appeared to respond.



Enlarge image
   At first, passengers were reluctant to leave the warm, well lit and ostensibly safe Titanic, which showed no outward signs of being in imminent danger, and board small, unlit, open lifeboats.



Enlarge image
   As the ship's tilt became more apparent, people started to become nervous, and some lifeboats began leaving fully loaded.



Enlarge image
   Shortly after 2:00 AM the waterline reached the bridge and forward boat deck, and all the lifeboats, save for the awkwardly located Collapsibles A and B, had been lowered. Collapsible D, with 44 of its 47 seats filled, was the last lifeboat to be lowered from the davits. The total number of vacancies was close to 475.



Enlarge image
   At around 1:40am, roughly an hour after the collision the forecastle is awash, with the mast and rigging appearing to come out of the water. Though many lights are now submerged they burn brightly; turning the ocean green



Enlarge image
   As the bridge sinks lower in the water, the wheelhouse becomes covered and the water starts to lap around the forward funnel.



Enlarge image
   The forward funnels disappears underneath the water; falling from the doomed liner. The reason given for the fall of the funnel is attributed to the cutting of the lines that held it in place; as these obstructed the launching of the collapsible boats



Enlarge image
   Around 2:10 AM, the stern rose out of the water, exposing the propellers, and the forward boat deck was flooding.



Enlarge image
   The last two lifeboats floated right off the deck as the ocean reached them: collapsible lifeboat B upside down, and collapsible lifeboat A half-filled with water.



Enlarge image
   On deck, people scrambled towards the stern or jumped overboard in hopes of reaching a lifeboat. As the ship's stern continued to slowly rise into the air, everything not secured crashed towards the bow. The electrical system finally failed and the lights, which had until now burned brightly, went out. Titanic's second funnel broke off and fell into the water



Enlarge image
   The stern rises high out of the water; exposing the propellers and the rudder



Enlarge image
   Stress on the hull caused Titanic to break apart into two large pieces between the third and fourth funnels, and the bow section went completely under.



Enlarge image
   The stern section briefly righted itself on the water before rising back up vertically



Enlarge image
   After a few moments, the stern section also sank into the ocean about two hours and forty minutes after the collision with the iceberg.



Enlarge image
   The last moments of the Titanic as the stern lowers itself into the water



Enlarge image
   At around 2:20am only the mast at the rear of the ship is visible



Enlarge image
   Before it too goes under and the last air emanates from the wreck.



Enlarge image
   From 2:20 to 2:30 air rises from the descending wreck causing a disturbance on the surface. Almost two hours after Titanic sank, RMS Carpathia, commanded by Captain Arthur Henry Rostron, arrived on scene and picked up its first lifeboat at 4:10 AM.



Comments

 I like it 
  April 15, 2012
Nice!:)
 I like it 
  April 16, 2011
good Lego model. dose it have life boats?
R H
 I like it 
Koen Rademaker
  November 8, 2010
Saw your movie !!! Very cool !!!
 I like it 
  January 31, 2010
Beautiful model, for the small size you really put in a lot of detail. I didnt sea the vidio but by the photos it seems very well done. You may want to make a new video because of the new evidence about the sinking. I have been fasinated by the story of the titanic since 1998 and I have been building titanics out of legos since 1998. Im working on a three and a half foot long Titanic but cant seem to get the boat deck right. I loved your other models as well. Once more great job and keep on researching, maybe you will be able to dive the titanic before it falls apart.
 I like it 
  June 1, 2009
The last survivor of the Titanic has died a few days ago. Aged 97, she will rest in peace.
 I like it 
  November 24, 2008
very good, i would include music in the video (the titanic's band played to the end, you know)
  September 29, 2007
I am not so keen on the video that goes with this MOC page, but the interior sinking videos are excellent.
 I like it 
  September 12, 2007
I for one think its a wonderful creation. Spectacular work!
 I like it 
  August 8, 2007
Cool! I really like your titanic! What do you think of mine?
 I like it 
  June 23, 2007
Very cool moddel. I actually floats!? Oh yes, and nice story telling.
 I like it 
  December 2, 2006
This is very good. Though through all of my years of research none of the life boats left the ship fully loaded.
 I like it 
  October 28, 2006
Very well done. You have done alot of research into this. I remember when I was alot younger, I became very interested in the sinking of the Titanic. I picked up many many books. It was around this time, that James Cameron released his movie "Titanic". However, there is one piece of information that is out of date in the older books, the movie, and in your write up. The only time the ship's stern reached a very steep incline, was AFTER it had broken in two. You see, the steel that was being made at the time was not as refined as it is now. There was alot of slag, and impurities. This was proven by actually raising a piece of the hull from the Atlantic, and running tests on it. With these new results, scientists came to the conclusion that the stern would have only raised out of the water about 12 degrees before the steel failed. However, even though the ship had broken in half, it remained connected at the keel (the thickest area of the hull, located at the base of the ship). Since the bow was heavy with water, it actually pulled, and dragged the stern to the bottom. The stern section was smaller than the bow, therefor, it was lighter, and able to rise to a very steep incline, and then rise up to a vertical position. Another interesting fact, is that since most of the refridgeration compartments were in the stern (these were air tight), pressure built up as it made its way to the bottom. Finally, once the pressure of the water around the stern section became too great, the air suddenly exploded through any cracks or small holes in the decking, and steel. This caused the poop deck to be peeled back onto itself, and is also the reason why the stern section of the wreck is in such poor condition compared to the bow. The pressure of the air escaping actually blew huge pieces of the hull right off the ship! The saddest part about this disater is that it could have been prevented. But white star line let their arrogance get the best of them. And they payed for it with the lives of well over a thousand people. Here is a little article about the steel used to build the Titanic http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/12/971227000141.htm
 I like it 
  October 25, 2006
Original idea! Excellent work, This truly amazes me. good quality write up too.
 I like it 
  October 25, 2006
Best. Project. Ever. I really like this, and the information ( I read it all) is very accurate. This deserves a 5/5.
 I like it 
  October 25, 2006
I really liked this. I saw it on brickshelf, it is one good model and the info (i didnt read it) looked good. Cool Moc and a cool thing to do it on! Keep up the good work!
 
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LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop The Sinking of the Titanic (Includes Video)Boats


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