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Failed M-Motor Steam Engine Design
An attempt at fitting an M-Motor inside the Emerald Night.
About this creation
I bought two Emerald Night sets last year, along with several custom coaches, to go around our Christmas Tree. I kept one locomotive stock with the XL-Motor , but I did not like how the motor took up all of the room in the cabin. Therefor I wanted to use an M-Motor inside of the boiler so that it would be hidden. I designed it first with LDD, and it all seemed to work out fine. So I ordered the motor and the extra parts that I would need to modify the second Emerald Night locomotive, and put it together. It ran fine as just the basic frame around the short circuit of track, but it experienced some difficulties with the turns once I added the boiler and the rest of the locomotive. It failed the two passenger coach test miserably. It experienced some power loss during the initial straightaway, but then could not make it through the rest of the turn. This was solved by being pushed by the XL-Motor Emerald Night, which also pulled the six car train with ease. Which was surprising.


Here you can see that the side of the boiler is stripped away to reveal two things. 1) The M-Motor, and 2) that I did not need many pieces to make this modification. The blue section is the IR Receiver. A noticeable external difference is that the receiver is more forward in the boiler than the original locomotive.


Here is a close-up of the M-Motor and the gearing modification that I made. Everything in the framework of the drive wheels is untouched. The gearing above the drive wheels is what I had changed.

I would really appreciate some feedback regarding this. I like the ability to use the M-Motor inside the boiler of smaller locomotives so that it is hidden from view, but the lack of power it has is a problem. If anyone has any suggestions for this and can provide some detailed pictures/instructions, that would be most appreciated.


Building instructions
Download building instructions (LEGO Digital Designer)

Comments

 I made it 
  June 21, 2013
Quoting Nick Jackson If you need help with gears, go to: http://gears.sariel.pl/
I was pointed to that site by someone on Flickr (cannot remember who at the moment, but I think Cale). If you look at my most recent 4-8-4 design, you can see the improvements that I have made to the internal motor design.
  June 13, 2013
If you need help with gears, go to: http://gears.sariel.pl/
 I made it 
  December 23, 2012
Quoting Hunter Dobbs Have you ever considered a Shay type design? They aren't fast but for a lot of pulling power in a small engine they can't be beat.
Eh, not really messing with smaller locomotives right now. I might in the future, and I will keep that idea in mind for then.
  December 21, 2012
Have you ever considered a Shay type design? They aren't fast but for a lot of pulling power in a small engine they can't be beat.
 I made it 
  December 17, 2012
Quoting Hunter Dobbs This is a great idea. I think you might be able to solve your problem by changing the 4-6-2 Pacific wheel arrangement into a 4-4-2 Atlantic; the train itself would be smaller and the motor wouldn't have as much stress on it.
I thought about doing a smaller locomotive with that type of wheel arrangement, but I did not for one reason. I tested the motor with just the basic locomotive frame (no boiler, cab, and just the wheel base for the tender) and it ran by itself just fine. It struggled a little bit as a full locomotive, and failed miserably on its first curve pulling a few cars. Perhaps in the future I will mess around with making the locomotive as a whole much smaller. Perhaps my problem is in the gearing from the motor to the drive wheels? Gearing is not my specialty, so I have no clue.
 I like it 
  December 17, 2012
This is a great idea. I think you might be able to solve your problem by changing the 4-6-2 Pacific wheel arrangement into a 4-4-2 Atlantic; the train itself would be smaller and the motor wouldn't have as much stress on it.
 I made it 
  November 14, 2012
Quoting jd davis is this 4-8-8-4 going to be ran or is it going to sit on a display? because they both have different answers. if it is to run, then i would suggest articulating both sets of drivers so it will make it around the sharp lego curves without derailing. i would use a 4x4 turntable plate with a round 4x4 plate on top for the body to rotate on. if it is just for display don't articulate it.
It will be ran. And thanks for the advice!
  November 14, 2012
is this 4-8-8-4 going to be ran or is it going to sit on a display? because they both have different answers. if it is to run, then i would suggest articulating both sets of drivers so it will make it around the sharp lego curves without derailing. i would use a 4x4 turntable plate with a round 4x4 plate on top for the body to rotate on. if it is just for display don't articulate it.
 I made it 
  November 13, 2012
Quoting jd davis quoting T.F. Twitch: "Yeah, I do not know if I should make the front drive wheel set swivel on a bogie plate, or if I should set it up like the leading and trailing trucks of the Emerald Night. If I was stateside and had real Legos, I could figure that part out. But since I am not, I am restricted to LDD." well what i do is i set both my trailing and piolet trucks that have 4 or more wheels on them like the front wheels on the EN
Yep, that is the idea. I was referring to the drive wheels since LDD is not the easiest to set up a train on curved track, and therefor getting the swivel point just right would be mostly guess work.
  November 13, 2012
quoting T.F. Twitch: "Yeah, I do not know if I should make the front drive wheel set swivel on a bogie plate, or if I should set it up like the leading and trailing trucks of the Emerald Night. If I was stateside and had real Legos, I could figure that part out. But since I am not, I am restricted to LDD." well what i do is i set both my trailing and piolet trucks that have 4 or more wheels on them like the front wheels on the EN
 I made it 
  November 13, 2012
Quoting Trevor Young That would be nice. If you do that, good luck getting it to navigate turns.
Yeah, I do not know if I should make the front drive wheel set swivel on a bogie plate, or if I should set it up like the leading and trailing trucks of the Emerald Night. If I was stateside and had real Legos, I could figure that part out. But since I am not, I am restricted to LDD.
  November 13, 2012
That would be nice. If you do that, good luck getting it to navigate turns.
 I made it 
  November 12, 2012
Quoting Trevor Young If you have enough motors one could make every truck on a passenger train a motor. Now that would be fast.
That is just ridiculous. I am hoping to create a design where the power section is limited to only the locomotive and tender. I am thinking that for a 4-8-8-4 configuration to have the lead and trailing trucks and the two (at least) trucks under the tender to be powered. Have a hollow-yet-sturdy locomotive, and the power-to-weight ration would be awesome.
  November 12, 2012
If you have enough motors one could make every truck on a passenger train a motor. Now that would be fast.
 I made it 
  November 12, 2012
Quoting Trevor Young Even with an XL motor my Night struggled a bit. A M motor just doesnt have the torque necessary to pull weight. M motors are better for light fast things....Like a switching engine....if you can manage to fit everything in it of course. I like your idea to put the motor Inside the boiler but if you want real pulling power Id say modify the tender to take a pivoting 3 axle truck with a PF motor. Those motors are fairly powerful and VERY fast.
My newer locomotive designs have the PF motor truck integrated into them. The locomotive I just designed for the wifey (the 4-8-4 that I uploaded) has two of them. I am designing a larger locomotive that has three. There is no such thing as overkill. My Emerald Night with the XL motor has no problems whatsoever, but then again passenger coaches are lighter than freight cars. I appreciate your feedback!
 I like it 
  November 12, 2012
Even with an XL motor my Night struggled a bit. A M motor just doesnt have the torque necessary to pull weight. M motors are better for light fast things....Like a switching engine....if you can manage to fit everything in it of course. I like your idea to put the motor Inside the boiler but if you want real pulling power Id say modify the tender to take a pivoting 3 axle truck with a PF motor. Those motors are fairly powerful and VERY fast.
 
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