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Techniques, Tips and Tricks
About this creation
A few days ago, I posted my 50th Moc on Mocpages. Over that stretch, I have invented a few interesting techniques, and I am going to share them here...

***

First off, I would like to link to a few very useful pages.

"Advanced Buidling Techniques" - This post on Eurobricks links to a whole bunch of interesting pages that all teach you great stuff

"The Unofficial LEGO Advanced Building Techniques Guide" - This demonstrates all the basic advanced techniques one needs to know

The Lego Techniques Pool on flickr - There is a bunch of interesting stuff you can find there, although those are usually minor techniques

Technique Exchange Group and The Rock(work) Club on Mocpages are both places where you can get tons of good advice. The Rockwork Club is a private Group, but I think there is a join button. If not, then go talk to Kai Bernstein, and I think he can help there.

***

Now, to the techniques!

This page is for original techniques from me only. If you have seen any of the following techniques before, notify me in the comments and I will remove that technique from this page. Feel free to use any of the techniques here, but if it is the round wall, please give me credit. Otherwise, I don't really mind whether there is credit or not. ;)


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I will start with my very own round wall technique. I used it once in a MOC, and though the Moc wasn't that good, I found the technique to be quite effective.



You will need: 21 2x6 Plates, 21 1x6 Tiles, 84 1/2 Pins and 42 Link Treads Wide with Two Pin Holes.



First, connect all the Tread Links. Then, put two Technic pins in each Tread Link. And then connect the 2x6 plates and 1x6 tiles, in the pattern seen on the picture.



A back view to give you a better idea of how it is supposed to look at that point.



Next, push each 1x6 tile away from its Track Link, one by one, so that it overlaps both neighboring 2x6 plates. Do this until you can connect the two ends. (I personally start at the left and then curve my way around, holding the construct under pressure until I can connect the two ends.) The end result should be as seen here.

Note: This wall design has a lot of pressure. Be careful when using it in a moc: When I experimented with it, it exploded apart several times in the Moc's early stages. Once the wall is secured, it holds nicely.



The positions of the 2x6 plate and 1x6 tiles can also be reversed. This puts less stress on the wall (as far as I can tell), and allows for more detailing on the 2x6 plates, but also creates larger indents and subsequently looks less round.



A back view with the 2x6 plates and 1x6 tiles in reverse position.

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Next is a smaller piece of construction that I have never used in a Moc before. This is the one where I am least confident that it is my own, and if it is not, please, please tell me in the comments so that no one gives me false credit.



As you can see, it is some sort of rocket assembly. It is probably useful for a lot of things, but mostly sci-fi.



Needed are four Bars 1L with Clip Mechanical Claw, one Dish 2 x 2 Inverted and one 2x2 round brick.



Construction is simple: You put the four bars with clip into the bottom of the 2x2 round brick as shown in the picture, then top it off with the inverted 2x2 dish.

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This one is one I have never seen before, and I am certain it is very useful. I have not used it in a Moc before, but I have experimented with it, and I am certain that there are a lot of promising uses for this one.



This is it. Very simple, I know, but I will go through the steps anyway.



Needed are three 1x2 bricks with vertical clip.



The clip of each 1x2 brick with clip goes onto the tube of the next one, like in the picture. Just connect the three in that way to form the triangle thing.

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Next is a cape technique! This one might have been used before as well, so please say so if it has.



There appears nothing special at first... But when you look closer, you will find that the cape is connected not at the neck, but at the arms. The implications are slight, but interesting.



First, you fit one arm through one of the holes in the cape and connect the arm to the body. Make sure that the hole with the arm through it is the bottom one.



Here is another view to make it a little clearer.



Then, bend the cape down, put the arm through the other hole (from the side facing the minifig) and connect the other arm. The instructions might be a little strange, but the picture shows it pretty well if you are stuck.

Disclaimer: I am not responsible for any rips that get into your minifig capes while trying this technique. Be careful, I ripped one cape with it already.



This technique leaves a gap at the back of the minifigure, but a backpack or something similar will help you out there.



Darth Malgus looks a lot better this way than with the teeny cape Lego gave him in the official fig...



Here is the comparison to a normally applied cape: The cape connected at the arms reaches all the way to the ground, and is wider, with a nice bend at the shoulder.



That also shows in the back.

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This Technique is yet another one I have never used before. I do not know what it would be useful for, but I am sure there are a lot of creative uses for it.



As you can see, it is a way to wedge clear panes between their frames. it creates an interesting texture, mostly, but it might be good for other things as well.



Needed are: 9 Glass for Window 1 x 2 x 2 Flat Front pieces, 2 Windows 1 x 2 x 2 Flat Front, 1 1x2 brick with studs on one side, 2 Headlight bricks and 3 1x2 plates.



First, assemble the 1x2 brick with studs on one side, the 3 1x2 plates and the 2 headlight bricks as seen in the picture. A 1x2 brick can be used to replace the 3 1x2 plates and a 1x2 brick with two technic holes can be used to replace the 2 headlight bricks. The important thing is that there is a 3-plate wide gap between the places where the two frames will go.



Next, insert the nine panes into one of the window frames. I usually stack them held between two fingers and then put them in all at once. Make sure the little knobbies are pointing into the frame.



After that, cap it off with the second frame...



...and finally, connect the two constructs.



The same technique can also be used with Glass for Window 1 x 2 x 3 Flat Front. In this case, you can only fit eight, but I do not know why.



The distance between the two frames with these larger panes is 5 and a half plates. Just replace the headlight bricks with another 1x2 brick with studs on one side, like in the picture.



The technique is also possible with Window 1 x 2 x 3 Flat Front pieces. Here, you need 14 panes.



And with the small panes and large frames, you need 15 panes.

***

Well, that is all so far. This page will be expanded, as I already know at least one technique that I forgot to photograph, so check back if you can or want to for more. And, as I said, if you have seen anyone else use any of these specific techniques before, then tell me in the comments and I will remove them from the page.

I hope this was helpful!



Comments

 I made it 
  April 8, 2014
Quoting Alex Rode Very nice! Thanks for sharing these :)
You are welcome! ;)
 I made it 
  April 8, 2014
Quoting Evan Botkin Cool! The curved wall idea is genius! I never thought to attach capes that way though; just customized trenchcoats.
Thanks! The curved wall idea is actually pretty simple when you think about it, just a circle of tank treads with plates attached on the inside...
 I like it 
  April 8, 2014
Very nice! Thanks for sharing these :)
 I like it 
  April 8, 2014
Cool! The curved wall idea is genius! I never thought to attach capes that way though; just customized trenchcoats.
 I made it 
  April 7, 2014
Quoting Professor B. Wow. I'll have to try some of those techniques out some time! Especially the curved wall. But that cape trick is pretty cool too!
Thanks! I actually discovered the cape technique at random, just messing around. :P I had no idea it would be so popular. :P
 I like it 
  April 7, 2014
Wow. I'll have to try some of those techniques out some time! Especially the curved wall. But that cape trick is pretty cool too!
 I made it 
  April 7, 2014
Quoting Lindel Baskin Some great techniques here. My favorite is the cape, I'll have to try that!
It seems that the cape one is the most popular one... Interesting, since I personally find it is not as advanced as some of the others. Oh, and thanks! :D
 I made it 
  April 7, 2014
Quoting Kai Bernstein Nice techniques! At last, the long-anticipated secret of the curved wall has been revealed!
At long last... :P Less than two months, actually. :P
 I made it 
  April 7, 2014
Quoting Gilbert Despathens You came up with some great ideas. The cape looks the most promising to me by far - I'll have to try it.
Now that you have seen the wall design, would you say it is possible to combine my design with yours? I am not yet quite sure how yours works...
 I made it 
  April 7, 2014
Quoting That guy you saw earlier I like the wall technique! Thanks for sharing :)
I did in fact forget to share at least one technique... But you are welcome. ;)
 I made it 
  April 7, 2014
Quoting Mitchell Long Very Helpful! Thankyou
You are welcome! :D
 I made it 
  April 7, 2014
Quoting Halhi 141 Interesting techniques! I've used something similar to the cape trick in many of my minifigures, though I use it to make a robe and use two capes, with one end of each connected to the arm socket and the other to the neck.
Interesting. I have to use your cape technique sometime...
 I like it 
  April 7, 2014
Nice techniques! At last, the long-anticipated secret of the curved wall has been revealed!
 I like it 
  April 7, 2014
Some great techniques here. My favorite is the cape, I'll have to try that!
 I like it 
  April 7, 2014
Great stuff. Thanks for sharing.
 I like it 
  April 7, 2014
Interesting techniques! I've used something similar to the cape trick in many of my minifigures, though I use it to make a robe and use two capes, with one end of each connected to the arm socket and the other to the neck.
 I like it 
  April 7, 2014
some pretty nice stuff here ;-) i think the most interesting is the wall... nice possibilities without gaps!
 I like it 
  April 7, 2014
You came up with some great ideas. The cape looks the most promising to me by far - I'll have to try it.
 I like it 
  April 7, 2014
Thanks for the great ideas.
  April 7, 2014
I like the wall technique! Thanks for sharing :)
 I like it 
  April 7, 2014
Very Helpful! Thankyou
 
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