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Buckyball C70 Fullerene
The second most common fullerene is C70 and it is related to the C60 truncated icosahedron. The rugby ball shaped C70 has 12 regular pentagonal faces, 10 regular hexagonal faces, 15 non-regular hexagonal faces, 70 vertices and 105 edges.
About this creation

Buckyball C70 Fullerene




The second most common fullerene is C70
and it is related to the C60 truncated icosahedron.
The rugby ball shaped C70
has 12 regular pentagonal faces,
10 regular hexagonal faces,
15 non-regular hexagonal faces,
70 vertices and 105 edges.










Richard Smalley's original graph done at Rice University in Houston, Texas.

Note: the second peak at 70 atoms.

There is a rotatable model of C70 here.

To my knowledge this is the first C70 MOC.


The Home of Republic of Texas Navy in LEGOs is right here on MOCpages.


enjoy

kurt

Notes:
  • RTS - Republic of Texas Ship
  • RTN - Republic of Texas Navy
  • LNA - Lego Naval Architect






Comments

RTN LNA
AA (Noname)
  July 6, 2011
OK, I got it. I'll write my explanation because it doesn't need any graphical aids.
RTN LNA
AA (Noname)
  July 5, 2011
Yes, but only if the height or the perimeter have a fixed value. I solved it using calculus and limits: The sum of angles is 180(n-2), therefore every angle in a regular polygon is 180(n-2)/n. As n approaches infinity, 180(n-2)/n approaches 180. The side is equal to P/n (P is the perimeter), and if P is a fixed number then as n approaches infinity the side approaches zero. How did you get the identities you've written? Anyway, your prize is a link on my homepage and six comments or three reviews (constructive criticism). This might interest you: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jG7vhMMXagQ
 I made it 
  July 5, 2011
Quoting AA (Noname) How did you get the identities you've written?
Which identities? the one for the heights? "I'm still trying to ask him for a longer explanation" I think 360/n, the top inside angle of the triangle with a side (one of the n) as it's base, lets say the other two side are of length "r". Now cut this triangle in half, with a line perpendicular to the base which goes through the vertex of the top of the triangle. It's easy to see from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigonometric_functions that side_length/2 = r/csc(180/n) so side_length goes to 0 as n goes to infinity. Likewise 180 - 360/n goes 180.
 I made it 
  July 5, 2011
Quoting AA (Noname) Are you interested in mathematics in general, or just geometry? Because I have an interesting mathematic puzzle: Suppose that you have a convex regular polygon with an infinite number of sides. What is the size of its angle and what is the size of its side?
:^) see http://mocpages.com/moc.php/92742 as the number of sides increases the length decreases, so the angle becomes 180 and the length goes to 0. It becomes a circle.
RTN LNA
 I like it 
AA (Noname)
  July 1, 2011
Are you interested in mathematics in general, or just geometry? Because I have an interesting mathematic puzzle: Suppose that you have a convex regular polygon with an infinite number of sides. What is the size of its angle and what is the size of its side?
 I like it 
  March 5, 2009
This looks like it was fun to build.. has a very cool look to it.
 I like it 
  January 23, 2009
@Thomas - not with C70 - that's a little more oblong. Maybe you could play rugby with it. C60 has the same shape and symmetry as a soccer ball.
 I like it 
  January 22, 2009
Cool! can you play soccer with it?
 
By RTN LNA
Add to my favorite builders

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Added January 22, 2009
 


LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Buckyball C70 FullereneSculpture


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